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GEN reports on advances in DNA vaccine delivery and production

02.09.2011
Scientists involved in DNA vaccine research are currently focused on two major issues: the creation of effective delivery systems and the development of more efficient biomanufacturing strategies, reports Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN). Top investigators in the field recently discussed these and other topics at a conference in San Diego entitled "DNA Vaccines: Building on Clinical Progress and Exploring New Targets," which was sponsored by the International Society of DNA Vaccines and organized by BioConferences International, a Mary Ann Liebert company, according to the September 1 issue of GEN.

David Weiner, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania professor and conference chair, noted that despite some early setbacks, DNA vaccine technology has advanced dramatically over the past few years and that therapies currently under evaluation are demonstrating the superb potential of plasmid-based vaccines. He emphasized that a range of novel vaccine methodologies have emerged, including new strategies for getting the plasmids into cells, increasing protein production once they are inside, and modifications of the vaccine proteins that increase their recognition and response by the immune system.

Some of the more promising delivery approaches include transdermal, needle-free patches, devices that transport the plasmids into the skin via air pressure, and electroporation, in which electrical pulses are used to temporarily open the cell membrane, allowing the plasmids easier access to the interior of cells.

On the manufacturing front, Philippe Ledent, Ph.D., process transfer and development manager at Eurogentec Biologics, explained that his company has faced major challenges scaling up the output of both protein and nucleic acid products. For plasmid production Eurogentec turned to fed-batch protocols for better growth control of the cultures, he said, adding that in a two-step process that was based on biomass expansion followed by plasmid DNA production, it was possible to increase fermentation yields 10-fold.

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Tony Hitchcock, head of manufacturing technologies at RecipharmCobra Biologics, provided another approach to plasmid purification. The company's product line includes bacteria, animal cells, viruses, novel proteins, and antibodies. The overall process that Hitchcock sought to optimize was quite similar to that followed by Eurogentec: high density fermentation, followed by alkaline cell lysis, chromatographic purification, and final formulation.

Also covered in the GEN article are DNA vaccine production techniques used by Althea Technologies and VGXI.

For a copy of the September 1 issue of GEN, please call (914) 740-2122, or email: ebicovny@liebertpub.com

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN, www.genengnews.com) has retained its position as the number one biotech publisher around the globe since its launch in 1981. GEN publishes a print edition 21 times a year and has additional exclusive editorial content online, such as news and analysis, podcasts, webinars, polls, videos, and application notes. GEN's unique news and technology focus includes the entire bioproduct life cycle from early-stage R&D, to applied research including omics, biomarkers, as well as diagnostics, to bioprocessing and commercialization.

John Sterling | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.genengnews.com/issue/toc/0/

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