Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Geisinger Piloting Innovative Lab Processing Instrument

12.08.2008
Geisinger Medical Center’s microbiology lab in Danville Pa. is the first in the country to use Copan Diagnostics’ Walk-Away Specimen Processor (WASP), which improves the efficiency and accuracy of laboratory specimen processing The WASP eases the demand for lab services by processing specimens automatically.

Newswise — Geisinger Medical Center’s microbiology lab is the first in the U.S. to use a new automatic instrument that improves the quality and efficiency of specimen planting and streaking and eases a growing demand for lab services.

Geisinger’s lab has helped test and customize Copan Diagnostics’ Walk-Away Specimen Processor (WASP), which hit the market earlier this year.

The WASP’s two main robots—dubbed Tarzan and Jane by the manufacturer—can process up to180 plates per hour. (It takes several hours to process that many specimens manually.)

“WASP frees up our technicians for other tasks,” said Geisinger Microbiology Lab Director Paul Bourbeau, PhD. “It’s helping us meet the increasing need for our lab services.”

Bourbeau said the WASP is a welcome addition to Geisinger’s microbiology lab, which performs more than 400,000 tests a year for three Geisinger hospitals, 40 Geisinger community practice sites and non-affiliated hospitals, prisons, nursing homes, and physicians’ offices.

“In addition to our clinical work for Geisinger, we also conduct specialty microbiology testing for regional clients,” Dr. Bourbeau explained. “So we have an incredible amount of specimens that are handled in our lab.”

The WASP processes swabs, urine, fecal samples and other liquid-based specimens. These specimens are collected from patients for the detection of bacteria that are the causes of a variety of diseases such as urinary tract and wound infections and other infections caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria such as MRSA.

Relying on a product called the ESwab to directly transfer swabs into liquid solutions, the WASP can increase the amount of specimens that is automatically processed and can increase the accuracy of specimen processing.

“This is a breakthrough in microbiology – a field that hasn’t benefited from the types of automation that are common in other labs,” Dr. Bourbeau said. “With this advanced technology, the WASP complements the outstanding work of our lab technicians.”

PHOTO AVAILABLE: Download a high-resolution digital photo of the WASP at http://www.geisinger.org/media

About Geisinger Health System
Founded in 1915, Geisinger Health System (Danville, PA) is one of the nation’s largest integrated health services organizations. Serving more than two million residents throughout central and northeastern Pennsylvania, the physician-led organization is at the forefront of the country's rapidly emerging electronic health records movement. Geisinger is comprised of two medical center campuses, three hospitals, a 720-member group practice, a not-for-profit health insurance company and the Henry Hood Center for Health Research—dedicated to creating innovative new models for patient care, satisfaction and clinical outcomes.

Justin Walden | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.geisinger.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Modern genetic sequencing tools give clearer picture of how corals are related
17.08.2017 | University of Washington

nachricht The irresistible fragrance of dying vinegar flies
16.08.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für chemische Ökologie

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Gold shines through properties of nano biosensors

17.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Greenland ice flow likely to speed up: New data assert glaciers move over sediment, which gets more slippery as it gets wetter

17.08.2017 | Earth Sciences

Mars 2020 mission to use smart methods to seek signs of past life

17.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>