Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fuzzy logic predicts cell aging

18.06.2010
The process of aging disturbs a broad range of cellular mechanisms in a complex fashion and is not well understood. Computer models using fuzzy logic might help to unravel these complexities and predict how aging progresses in cells and organisms, according to a study from Drexel University in Philadelphia and Children's Hospital Boston.

"One important goal of computational approaches in aging is to develop integrated models of a unifying aging theory in order to better understand the progression of aging phenotypes grounded on molecular mechanisms," said Andres Kriete, Associate Professor at Drexel's School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems and lead author of the study.

The study, which will appear in the June issue of PLOS Computational Biology (http://www.ploscompbiol.org/doi/pcbi.1000820), relates progressive damage and dysfunction in aging, dubbed a vicious cycle, to inflammatory and metabolic stress response pathways. Interestingly, the activation of these pathways remodels the inner functioning of the cell in a protective and adaptive manner and thus extends lifespan.

This is the first time that scientists have applied fuzzy logic modeling to the field of aging. "Since cellular biodynamics in aging may be considered a complex control system, a fuzzy logic approach seems to be particularly suitable," said Dr. William Bosl, co-author of this study. Dr. Bosl, a staff scientist in the Informatics Program at Children's Hospital Boston, developed a fuzzy logic modeling platform called Bionet together with a cell biologist, Dr. Rong Li of the Stowers Institute for Medical Research in Kansas City, to study the complex interactions that occur in a cell's machinery using the kind of qualitative information gained from laboratory experiments.

Fuzzy logic can handle imprecise input, but makes precise decisions and has wide industrial applications from air conditioning to anti-lock break systems in cars, using predefined rules. In a similar fashion, the aging model relies on sets of rules drawn from experimental data to describe molecular interactions. "Integration of such data is the declared goal of systems biology, which enables simulation of the response of cells to signaling cues, cell cycling and cell death," said Glenn Booker, who is Faculty at the College of Information Science and Technology at Drexel and co-author on the study.

Applications in aging are currently geared towards deciphering the underlying connections and networks. "We have to realize that the real strength of computational systems biology in aging is to be able to predict and develop strategies to control cellular networks better as they may be related to age related diseases," said Dr. Kriete, "and our approach is just a first step in this direction."

Keri Stedman | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.childrens.harvard.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood
23.02.2017 | American Chemical Society

nachricht New Mechanisms of Gene Inactivation may prevent Aging and Cancer
23.02.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Alternsforschung - Fritz-Lipmann-Institut e.V. (FLI)

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'

23.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

'Quartz' crystals at the Earth's core power its magnetic field

23.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>