Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Frustrated Pair Captures CO2

02.07.2009
Novel concept for the binding of carbon dioxide without a metal-containing catalyst

Carbon dioxide contributes to the greenhouse effect, but practicable solutions for its capture and storage have not really been found.

However, it might be possible to kill two birds with one stone if carbon dioxide could be used as a raw material. Unlike the carbon sources commonly used today—fossil fuels and natural gas— carbon dioxide is a renewable resource and an environmentally friendly chemical reagent.

Unfortunately, the carbon–oxygen bonds are too strong to be broken easily. Until now, this has mainly been achieved with the use of metal-containing catalysts. A German–Canadian cooperative effort has now developed a new concept that works without metals: as they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the team led by Gerhard Erker and Stefan Grimme at the University of Münster and Douglas W. Stephan at the University of Toronto uses so-called frustrated Lewis acid/base pairs to reversibly bind carbon dioxide under mild conditions.

An organic borane and an organic phosphine form a typical Lewis pair: As a Lewis base, the phosphine has too many electrons. The borane on the other hand, a Lewis acid, has an electron deficiency. The Lewis base thus makes its free electron pair available to the Lewis acid. The phosphine and borane form an adduct that is held together by way of the shared electron pair. However, if both partners have bulky side groups, they cannot come together to form the desired bond. They are then described as a “frustrated” Lewis pair.

The researchers exposed a solution of such a frustrated pair to an atmosphere of CO2 under two bars of pressure. This immediately resulted in a reaction, which formed a white solid. What happened? The phosphorus atom in the frustrated phosphine uses its electron pair to bind to the carbon of the CO2, and the boron atom of the frustrated borane snaps up the free electron pair of one of the oxygen atoms of the CO2 and binds to it. In this way, the carbon dioxide couples the two partners together, alleviating their frustration.

With the application of heat or certain solvents, the carbon dioxide can be released and the Lewis pair returned to its original frustrated state. The researchers are now investigating how the captured CO2 could be chemically transformed for use as a feedstock.

Author: Gerhard Erker, Universität Münster (Germany), http://www.uni-muenster.de/Chemie.oc/erker/index.html

Title: Reversible Metal-Free Carbon Dioxide Binding by Frustrated Lewis Pairs

Angewandte Chemie International Edition, doi: 10.1002/anie.200901636

Gerhard Erker | Angewandte Chemie
Further information:
http://pressroom.angewandte.org
http://www.uni-muenster.de/Chemie.oc/erker/index.html

Further reports about: Angewandte Chemie CO2 Carbon carbon dioxide carbon source oxygen atom

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood
23.02.2017 | American Chemical Society

nachricht New Mechanisms of Gene Inactivation may prevent Aging and Cancer
23.02.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Alternsforschung - Fritz-Lipmann-Institut e.V. (FLI)

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system'

23.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

'Quartz' crystals at the Earth's core power its magnetic field

23.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood

23.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>