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Florida State University chemist may hold key to building a better toxin mousetrap

25.09.2012
A Florida State University chemist's work could lead to big improvements in our ability to detect and eliminate specific toxins in our environment.

Featured on the cover of the prestigious Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS), Sourav Saha's specialized work to strip electrons from the toxic chemical known as fluoride is producing a variety of unique results.

"I started out with the very basic premise of trying to find new ways to detect toxic fluoride in solutions," said Saha, an assistant professor of chemistry at Florida State. "As I got further into that work I was able to create a compound that could actually strip the electrons right off the molecule, producing a variety of tangible benefits such as toxin detection and removal."

Saha's initial fluoride-detection work led to a $100,000 grant from the Petroleum Research Foundation to further explore the possibilities of his research. Using that money, he was able to bring in additional expertise and build his "fluoride-robbing" compound that is the central feature of the work featured on the JACS cover.

"This work is very exciting and novel because the results are surprising," said Timothy Logan, chairman of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Florida State. "Molecules always have affinity for electrons, with some molecules having a greater affinity than others. Flouride has the highest electron affinity of all, so the ability to strip off electrons from fluoride, especially in the presence of other molecules with lower electron affinity, is truly unique."

Although Saha is excited about the possibilities of his new compound in toxin cleanup, he sees a huge variety of potential applications for his research.

"I think toxin removal is one of the most obvious and relatable benefits my work could lead to, but in reality, there are many additional implications this work could have on daily life," Saha said. "For instance, we could develop this research to create all new types of plastics that could exhibit unique qualities, or improve the effectiveness of devices, such as batteries, that are used to store and transfer energy."

To read more about Saha's work in the JACS, visit http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/ja303173n. To learn more about Saha, visit http://www.chem.fsu.edu/bio.php?id=838.

Florida State University, rated RU/VH ("Research University/Very High" research activity) by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, is one of the nation's leading research and creative-activity institutions. With nearly $204 million in external research funding in 2011 and a large collection of unique, cutting-edge scientific and performing arts facilities, Florida State offers faculty and students unparalleled opportunities to expand the frontiers of knowledge and discovery in their areas of expertise. To learn more about Florida State research, locate a subject matter expert or arrange an interview on a specific research or creative topic, contact Tom Butler at tbutler@admin.fsu.edu or Florida State's News and Research Communications Office at (850) 644-4030.

CONTACT: Tom Butler, University Communications (850) 644-8634; tbutler@admin.fsu.edu

Tom Butler | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.fsu.edu

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