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EMBO recognizes 63 researchers for advances in life sciences

27.10.2010
The European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) today announced the recognition of outstanding research contributions by 63 life scientists from 14 countries. The researchers are awarded the life-long honour of EMBO membership, joining almost 1500 of the world’s leading molecular biologists.

“EMBO Members are the basis for the organization’s international reputation and our most valuable asset,” said Maria Leptin, EMBO Director. “We welcome this year’s group of exceptional scientists and look forward to their fresh input and ideas to advance the life sciences.”

Each year, the EMBO membership nominates and elects new members based on scientific excellence. Forty-nine from this year’s election work in countries across Europe and become EMBO Members. Fourteen of those elected work in the United States, Japan and Taiwan and are honoured as EMBO Associate Members. International mobility has been key for many of the new members and associate members as they progressed in their scientific careers, fostering innovative and collaborative research globally.

The 63 scientists represent a broad cross-section of research covering classical areas of molecular biology as well as rapidly developing fields such as systems biology, neuroscience and cancer biology. Many of them bridge across a number of fields, from biology to medicine, biochemistry or biophysics. Twelve female researchers are recognized this year.

By their involvement with the organization’s activities, the selected researchers will help shape the direction of the life sciences in Europe. More than half of the EMBO Members contribute by serving on advisory editorial boards of the organization’s four scientific journals, mentoring young researchers, providing expertise to EMBO programmes and taking the lead on new initiatives. Members also nominate candidates for the annual EMBO Gold Medal award.

A list of the newly elected EMBO Members and Associate Members accompanies this announcement. They will be welcomed into the EMBO community at the EMBO Members’ Workshop to be held in Heidelberg in autumn 2011.

NEW EMBO MEMBERS 2010

Anna Akhmanova, Netherlands
Judith Patricia Armitage, United Kingdom Jürg Bähler, United Kingdom Yves Barral, Switzerland Michael Bate, United Kingdom Roland Beckmann, Germany Michel Bornens, France Nick Brown, United Kingdom Keith Caldecott, United Kingdom Jason W. Chin, United Kingdom Tim Clausen, Austria Vincent Colot, France Maria Pia Cosma, Spain Gideon J. Davies, United Kingdom Ilan Davis, United Kingdom Stefanie Dimmeler, Germany Patrik Ernfors, Sweden Marie-Anne Felix, France Dominique Ferrandon, France Jiri Friml, Belgium Rudolf Glockshuber, Switzerland Keith Gull, United Kingdom Douglas Hanahan, Switzerland Michael Häusser, United Kingdom Karl-Peter Hopfner, Germany Laurent Keller, Switzerland Ulrike Kutay, Switzerland Karim Labib, United Kingdom Ernest Laue, United Kingdom Thomas Laux, Germany Elena A. Levashina, France Carlos López-Otín, Spain Zachary F. Mainen, Portugal Andreas Radbruch, Germany Freddy Radtke, Switzerland Nikolaus Rajewsky, Germany Erez Raz, Germany Carol Robinson, United Kingdom Giampietro Schiavo, United Kingdom Ton N.M. Schumacher, Netherlands Irmgard Sinning, Germany Holger Stark, Germany Michel O. Steinmetz, Switzerland Sharon Tooze, United Kingdom Miltos Tsiantis, United Kingdom Malcolm White, United Kingdom Kenneth H. Wolfe, Ireland John Wood, United Kingdom Arturo Zychlinsky, Germany
NEW ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 2010

Shizuo Akira, Japan
Elizabeth H. Blackburn, United States
Roger J. Davis, United States
Andrew Z. Fire, United States
Jeffrey Friedman, United States
Elaine Fuchs, United States
Michael R. Green, United States
Thomas M. Jessell, United States
Robert Martienssen, United States
Thomas D. Pollard, United States
Clifford Tabin, United States
Robert A. Weinberg, United States
Chi-Huey Wong, Taiwan, Province of China Shinya Yamanaka, Japan

| EMBO
Further information:
http://www.embo.org

Further reports about: Biochemistry EMBO Molecular Biology cancer biology life science

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