Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cytotoxins contribute to virulence of deadly epidemic bacterial infections

02.02.2017

Severity of group A Streptococcus infections, including 'flesh-eating disease,' attributed to presence of 2 toxins, according to a new report in The American Journal of Pathology

Beginning in the mid-1980s, an epidemic of severe invasive infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes), also known as group A streptococcus (GAS), occurred in the United States, Europe, and elsewhere. The general public became much more aware of these serious and sometimes fatal infections, commonly known as the "flesh-eating disease." Potent cytotoxins produced by this human pathogen contribute to the infection. A new study in The American Journal of Pathology reports that the bacteria's full virulence is dependent on the presence of two specific cytotoxins, NADase (SPN) and streptolysin O (SLO).


This is a scanning electron micrograph of the interaction of Streptococcus pyogenes (rounded blue objects) with a human neutrophil (large purple objects with ruffles and extensions).

Credit: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Bacteria produce cytotoxins that can cause cell death and result in infections of the deep fascia and other tissues, including necrotizing fasciitis. "Our research revealed that the most severe form of the disease requires two cytotoxins. If either one or both are missing, the infection is much less dangerous," explained lead investigator James M. Musser, MD, PhD, chairman of the Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine at Houston Methodist Research Institute (Houston, TX).

To evaluate how the toxins SPN and SLO act together, investigators used mice infected with genetically altered S. pyogenes strains that produced either, both, or neither of the toxins. They found that mutant strains lacking either SPN or SLO or both do not cause the most severe forms of necrotizing fasciitis, necrotizing myositis, bacteremia, and other soft tissue infections. Production of both toxins was required for full infection virulence.

Resistance to bacterial infections depends in part on innate immunity conferred by white blood cells, including polymorphonuclear leukocytes (primarily neutrophils). The researchers found evidence that infections with SPN- and SLO-deficient S. pyogenes could be controlled better because they were less likely to resist the bactericidal effects of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 700 to 1,100 cases of necrotizing fasciitis caused by group A streptococcus have occurred yearly since 2010. Although the disease primarily affects the young and old and those with underlying chronic conditions, it may also develop in healthy individuals. Transmission occurs person-to-person, many times through a break in the skin.

"We do not have a Group A strep vaccine that works right now," commented Dr. Musser. "The information we gained from this research may help to develop more effective therapeutics, such as inhibitors of these two toxins, or even a vaccine."

Media Contact

Eileen Leahy
ajpmedia@elsevier.com
732-238-3628

 @elseviernews

https://www.elsevier.com/ 

Eileen Leahy | EurekAlert!

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht ADP-ribosylation on the right track
26.04.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Biologie des Alterns

nachricht Flavins keep a handy helper in their pocket
25.04.2018 | University of Freiburg

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Why we need erasable MRI scans

New technology could allow an MRI contrast agent to 'blink off,' helping doctors diagnose disease

Magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a widely used medical tool for taking pictures of the insides of our body. One way to make MRI scans easier to read is...

Im Focus: BAM@Hannover Messe: innovative 3D printing method for space flight

At the Hannover Messe 2018, the Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM) will show how, in the future, astronauts could produce their own tools or spare parts in zero gravity using 3D printing. This will reduce, weight and transport costs for space missions. Visitors can experience the innovative additive manufacturing process live at the fair.

Powder-based additive manufacturing in zero gravity is the name of the project in which a component is produced by applying metallic powder layers and then...

Im Focus: Molecules Brilliantly Illuminated

Physicists at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics, which is jointly run by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, have developed a high-power laser system that generates ultrashort pulses of light covering a large share of the mid-infrared spectrum. The researchers envisage a wide range of applications for the technology – in the early diagnosis of cancer, for instance.

Molecules are the building blocks of life. Like all other organisms, we are made of them. They control our biorhythm, and they can also reflect our state of...

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Why we need erasable MRI scans

26.04.2018 | Medical Engineering

Balancing nuclear and renewable energy

26.04.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Researchers 3-D print electronics and cells directly on skin

26.04.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>