Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Contrast Agent for Tumor Diagnostics

24.03.2011
Phosphorescent metal–organic coordination polymers for optical imaging

X-rays are not the only way: visible and especially infrared light can also be used to image human tissue. The effectiveness of optical imaging processes can be significantly improved with suitable dyes used as contrast agents.

In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a team led by Wenbin Lin at the University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill, USA) has now introduced a novel contrast agent that marks tumor cells in vitro. The dye is a phosphorescent ruthenium complex incorporated into nanoparticles of a metal–organic coordination polymer, which allows an extraordinarily high level of dye loading.

Fluorescent dyes accumulate in varying amounts in different types of tissue. Such contrast agents make it possible to use optical imaging to differentiate between healthy and tumorous tissue. However, this method is limited by the fact that very high concentrations of dye are needed to produce sufficiently strong fluorescence. Organic dye molecules packed at high concentrations into nanocapsules tend to quench each other’s fluorescence. Materials that fluoresce more strongly, such as quantum dots, are often not biocompatible.

This team has now developed an alternative: metal complexes connected to form lattice-like coordination polymers. Coordination polymers are metal–organic structures consisting of metal ions, which act as connecting points, linked by bridges made of organic molecules or coordination complexes. The scientists made such polymers with bridges consisting of a light-emitting complex of the metal ruthenium. Zirconium ions proved to be suitable connecting points. These tiny structures form spherical nanoparticles.

The ruthenium complexes do not fluoresce, but rather phosphoresce, which means that they emit light for a proportional length of time after irradiation with light. Because they are not placed inside a nano-transport container, but are a component of the nanoparticle, it is possible to attain a very high level of dye loading—in this instance over 50 %. Quenching of the phosphorescence at high concentrations does not occur in such complexes.

In order to prevent the glowing particles from rapidly dissolving and to increase the biocompatibility, they were coated with thin layers of silicon dioxide and a layer of polyethylene glycol. The latter acts as an anchor point for anisamide, a molecule that specifically binds to receptors that are far more common on the surfaces of many types of tumor cell than on healthy cells.

In a cell culture, it was possible to selectively mark a line of cancer cells with the phosphorescent nanoparticles. The researchers hope that it will be possible to develop contrast agents for the use of optical imaging for tumor detection based on these new metal–organic nanomaterials.

Author: Wenbin Lin, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA), http://www.chem.unc.edu/people/faculty/linw/wlindex.
Title: Phosphorescent Nanoscale Coordination Polymers as Contrast Agents for Optical Imaging

Angewandte Chemie International Edition, Permalink to the article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201008277

Wenbin Lin | Angewandte Chemie
Further information:
http://pressroom.angewandte.org
http://www.chem.unc.edu/people/faculty/linw/wlindex

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht What happens in the cell nucleus after fertilization
06.12.2016 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Researchers uncover protein-based “cancer signature”
05.12.2016 | Universität Basel

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Porous crystalline materials: TU Graz researcher shows method for controlled growth

07.12.2016 | Materials Sciences

Simple processing technique could cut cost of organic PV and wearable electronics

06.12.2016 | Materials Sciences

3-D printed kidney phantoms aid nuclear medicine dosing calibration

06.12.2016 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>