Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Complex pathogens: Effects of gastric bacterium Helicobacter pylori on other organs revealed

05.02.2016

Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium colonising the stomach, has a bad reputation: It is said to cause gastritis, stomach ulcers and, in the long run, even cancer. And yet, it seems the bacterium could also have some positive effects. A team of scientists from Graz and New York examined the impact of a Helicobacter infection on the stomach, intestines and lungs over a period of six months. The unexpected findings were published in the current edition of the prestigious journal Cell Reports.

Some two kilogrammes of bacteria live on and in our body. It is not always easy to distinguish between “good” and “bad” bacteria because their complex interactions have barely been explored. This is also true for Helicobacter pylori. “We do know, for example, that in societies where the prevalence of Helicobacter is high, children suffer less frequently from asthma”, says Dr. Sabine Kienesberger of the Institute of Molecular Biosciences at the University of Graz, lead author of the paper in Cell Reports.


Sabine Kienesberger-Feist

Photo: Uni Graz/Lunghammer


The scientists discovered various interesting relationships: “Our investigations have shown that a Helicobacter infection leads to an accumulation of specific T-cells in the lungs. These cells play an important role in our immune system”, Kienesberger says.

The team was particularly surprised to see that a Heliobacter infection also entails changes in the composition of the intestinal flora which can, in turn, stimulate the immune system. The researchers also found shifts in hormonal balance. “The concentration of the ‘hunger hormone’ ghrelin, for example, increased. Excessive production of this hormone stimulates the appetite. Ghrelin is also known to have an impact on the immune system”, Kienesberger adds.

What makes this study so special is the long-term observation of the Helicobacter infection and its effects in the mouse model as a dynamic process over an extended period. Kienesberger: “The early and to some extent contradictory effects on the lungs came as a surprise, even though an increased immune reaction in the stomach was noted only later.” The study provides a sound basis for further research and targeted investigation of the complex interactions of Helicobacter, microbiome and the immune system.

Kienesberger cooperated with colleagues from the University of Graz, the Medical University of Graz, and from New York University School of Medicine for this publication. She carried out the major part of her investigations during her 30-month postdoc programme in New York where she worked in the team of Prof. Dr. Martin Blaser, a pioneer in microbiome research. At the University of Graz she is a member of Univ.-Prof. Dr. Ellen Zechner’s working group. The study was undertaken in the framework of BioTechMed-Graz, the joint research initiative of the University of Graz, the Medical University of Graz and Graz University of Technology.

Publication:
Gastric Helicobacter pylori Infection Affects Local and Distant Microbial Populations and Host Responses
Sabine Kienesberger, Laura M. Cox, Alexandra Livanos, Xue-Song Zhang, Jennifer Chung, Guillermo I. Perez-Perez, Gregor Gorkiewicz, Ellen L. Zechner, and Martin J. Blaser
Cell Reports, February 16, 2016

Contact:
Dr. Sabine Kienesberger-Feist
Institute of Molecular Biosciences at the University of Graz, Austria
Phone: +43 (0)316/380-5505
E-mail: sabine.kienesberger@uni-graz.at

Mag. Gudrun Pichler | Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz
Further information:
http://www.uni-graz.at

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Designer cells: artificial enzyme can activate a gene switch
22.05.2018 | Universität Basel

nachricht Flow of cerebrospinal fluid regulates neural stem cell division
22.05.2018 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: LZH showcases laser material processing of tomorrow at the LASYS 2018

At the LASYS 2018, from June 5th to 7th, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) will be showcasing processes for the laser material processing of tomorrow in hall 4 at stand 4E75. With blown bomb shells the LZH will present first results of a research project on civil security.

At this year's LASYS, the LZH will exhibit light-based processes such as cutting, welding, ablation and structuring as well as additive manufacturing for...

Im Focus: Self-illuminating pixels for a new display generation

There are videos on the internet that can make one marvel at technology. For example, a smartphone is casually bent around the arm or a thin-film display is rolled in all directions and with almost every diameter. From the user's point of view, this looks fantastic. From a professional point of view, however, the question arises: Is that already possible?

At Display Week 2018, scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP will be demonstrating today’s technological possibilities and...

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

Im Focus: Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA

Next-generation gravitational wave detector in space will complement LIGO on Earth

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A...

Im Focus: Entangled atoms shine in unison

A team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. This fundamental demonstration could lead to the development of highly sensitive optical gradiometers for the precise measurement of the gravitational field or the earth's magnetic field.

The age of quantum technology has long been heralded. Decades of research into the quantum world have led to the development of methods that make it possible...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Designer cells: artificial enzyme can activate a gene switch

22.05.2018 | Life Sciences

PR of MCC: Carbon removal from atmosphere unavoidable for 1.5 degree target

22.05.2018 | Earth Sciences

Achema 2018: New camera system monitors distillation and helps save energy

22.05.2018 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>