Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Using combinatorial libraries to engineer genetic circuits advances synthetic biology

24.04.2009
Streamlining the construction of synthetic gene networks has led a team of Boston University researchers to develop a technique that couples libraries of diversified components with computer modeling to guide predictable gene network construction without the back and forth tweaking.

By applying engineering principles to biological systems where a set of components can evolve into networks that display desired behaviors – known as synthetic biology -- , has led to new opportunities for biofabrication, drug manufacturing -- even potential biofuels.

And while there have been notable successes, the basic process of building and assembling a predictable gene network from bio-molecular parts remains a major challenge that is often frustrating. The time-consuming tweaking phase often requires many months of swapping out different chemical inputs, RNA regulators and promotors before the sought -after network is realized.

In a paper published online this week in Nature Biotechnology, the research team, led by James J. Collins, BU professor of biomedical engineering, focused on ways to speed up the construction process by assembling a library of 20 versions of two gene promotors and a simple synthesis technique to create component libraries for synthetic biology. Each version covered a wide range gene expression. With the activity levels calculated from the component libraries, the scientists turned to a computer model and designed and built a basic gene circuit to predict how fluorescent protein expression varied with levels of promoter-inhibiting chemicals.

Using the same simulation, for the simple gene circuit the researchers went the next step with a genetic timer, a more complicated circuit. However, computer simulation, on its own, was unable to predict the behavior of this timing circuit. They then built a representative genetic timer using a promoter from each of their libraries and, over time, tracked its behavior. Based on information from one network, the research team was able to calibrate their model and achieve accurate predictions from all the other possible network combinations. These timers, the study notes, are effectively genetic toggle switches.

One last test of these genetic timers was to assemble and test one in yeast, which could accurately time yeast sedimentation -- a process that can be applied to biotechnology and some popular brewed beverages.

"The phenotype is crucial in industrial beer, wine and bioethanol fermentation, as it allows for easy removal of yeast sediments after all the sugars have been converted to ethanol," the paper noted.

The researchers concluded that their method using combinatorial libraries to engineer genetic circuits moves the "tweaking" from the back-end of gene network engineering to the front-end.

"Projects undertaken with this approach will help accelerate synthetic biology by yielding many more components for the community," the paper concludes, noting the need for extensive characterization of each component is eliminated or substantially reduced.

"Our work also provides an accessible method for introducing predictable, controlled variability to networks, a feature that is increasingly becoming desirable as synthetic biology enters its second decade."

The research paper, "Diversity-based, Model-Guided Construction of Synthetic Gene Networks with Predicted Functions, "was authored by Tom Ellis and Xiao Wang, both post doctoral students at Boston University's Center for BioDynamics and Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Collins.

Founded in 1839, Boston University is an internationally recognized institution of higher education and research. With more than 30,000 students, it is the fourth largest independent university in the United States. BU consists of 17 colleges and schools along with a number of multi-disciplinary centers and institutes which are central to the school's research and teaching mission.

Ronald Rosenberg | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.bu.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Warming ponds could accelerate climate change
21.02.2017 | University of Exeter

nachricht An alternative to opioids? Compound from marine snail is potent pain reliever
21.02.2017 | University of Utah

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Impacts of mass coral die-off on Indian Ocean reefs revealed

21.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Novel breast tomosynthesis technique reduces screening recall rate

21.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Use your Voice – and Smart Homes will “LISTEN”

21.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>