Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Chinese expedition traces source of global fish invasion

09.07.2010
Bournemouth University (BU) Professor Rudy Gozlan is leading an Anglo-Chinese expedition through remote parts of China in the weeks ahead to discover the origins of a global fish invasion.

Together with colleagues from BU and the Chinese Academy of Science, Professor Gozlan will travel over 10,000 kilometres along two major rivers – the Huang He (Yellow) and Chang Jiang (Yangtze) – to collect samples of a species of Topmouth gudgeon.

Professor Gozlan, of the University’s Centre for Conservation Ecology and Environmental Change, is producing a blog of his journey which can be followed at http://www.expeditionchina2010.blogspot.com/.

The expedition represents a scientific, cultural and historical journey as Professor Gozlan traces the historic movement of the gudgeon from its native East China to become one of the world’s most prolific invasive species with populations extending as far as Europe and North Africa.

Recently, Professor Gozlan has identified that populations of the Topmouth gudgeon outside of China are healthy carriers of a deadly non-species specific parasite (Sphaerothecum destruens). These parasite-carrying gudgeons pose a threat to fish diversity, particularly in Europe where invaluable salmon stocks important to Britain’s aquaculture industry are at risk.

“This is the story of an innocent movement of fish from the East coast to the West part of China which has rippled all the way to Britain some 50 years later,” said Professor Gozlan. “The Topmouth gudgeon is small in size (maximum length circa 9cm), highly fecund with batch spawning and nest guarding behaviour and highly tolerant to environmental changes giving it all of the attributes of a successful invader.”

The Topmouth gudgeon’s first introduction outside of China was in reservoirs and ponds around the Black Sea as part of a fish farming agreement between China and the former Eastern block. Following long distances and hitchhiking cross country with movements of carp, it rapidly escaped and colonised local waters, dominating communities in ponds and lakes.

“The gudgeon’s stealth invasion of the world started in the 1950’s with the end of the Chinese civil war (from around 1840 to 1949) which had restricted human population mobility and trade,” said Professor Gozlan. “At that time, there was an increasing need for developing new sources of animal protein and black carp, grass carp, silver carp and big head carp were rapidly introduced from East China especially from the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River basin to many other places including Yunnan, Qinghai, Gansu and Xinjiang.

"This species had been cultured traditionally in East China for a long time with specific culturing techniques,” he continued. “These carp introductions for aquaculture, however, have been the beachhead of topmouth gudgeon’s great escape.”

During the expedition, Professor Gozlan is gathering material including live samples of Topmouth gudgeon from 33 locations covering nine major catchments. The samples will be compared to material collected from populations established from the first introduction in each country within the non-native range.

Populations will be compared for their life history traits and parasitic communities as well as their population genetic structure within native range but also across the introduced range.

Professor Rudy Gozlan’s Academic Profile - http://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/about/people_at_bu/our_academic_staff/CS/

profiles/rgozlan.html

Charles Elder | Bournemouth University (BU)
Further information:
http://www.bournemouth.ac.uk
http://www.expeditionchina2010.blogspot.com/

Further reports about: Chang Chinese herbs Gozlan Yangtze River environmental change

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Taking screening methods to the next level
17.10.2017 | IMBA - Institut für Molekulare Biotechnologie der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften GmbH

nachricht Are there sustainable solutions in dealing with dwindling phosphorus resources?
16.10.2017 | Leibniz-Institut für Nutzierbiologie (FBN)

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

Im Focus: New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawater

Hybrid material converts more sunlight and can weather seawater's harsh conditions

It's possible to produce hydrogen to power fuel cells by extracting the gas from seawater, but the electricity required to do it makes the process costly. UCF...

Im Focus: Small collisions make big impact on Mercury's thin atmosphere

Mercury, our smallest planetary neighbor, has very little to call an atmosphere, but it does have a strange weather pattern: morning micro-meteor showers.

Recent modeling along with previously published results from NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft -- short for Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

‘Find the Lady’ in the quantum world

17.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A single photon reveals quantum entanglement of 16 million atoms

16.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>