Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Chinese expedition traces source of global fish invasion

09.07.2010
Bournemouth University (BU) Professor Rudy Gozlan is leading an Anglo-Chinese expedition through remote parts of China in the weeks ahead to discover the origins of a global fish invasion.

Together with colleagues from BU and the Chinese Academy of Science, Professor Gozlan will travel over 10,000 kilometres along two major rivers – the Huang He (Yellow) and Chang Jiang (Yangtze) – to collect samples of a species of Topmouth gudgeon.

Professor Gozlan, of the University’s Centre for Conservation Ecology and Environmental Change, is producing a blog of his journey which can be followed at http://www.expeditionchina2010.blogspot.com/.

The expedition represents a scientific, cultural and historical journey as Professor Gozlan traces the historic movement of the gudgeon from its native East China to become one of the world’s most prolific invasive species with populations extending as far as Europe and North Africa.

Recently, Professor Gozlan has identified that populations of the Topmouth gudgeon outside of China are healthy carriers of a deadly non-species specific parasite (Sphaerothecum destruens). These parasite-carrying gudgeons pose a threat to fish diversity, particularly in Europe where invaluable salmon stocks important to Britain’s aquaculture industry are at risk.

“This is the story of an innocent movement of fish from the East coast to the West part of China which has rippled all the way to Britain some 50 years later,” said Professor Gozlan. “The Topmouth gudgeon is small in size (maximum length circa 9cm), highly fecund with batch spawning and nest guarding behaviour and highly tolerant to environmental changes giving it all of the attributes of a successful invader.”

The Topmouth gudgeon’s first introduction outside of China was in reservoirs and ponds around the Black Sea as part of a fish farming agreement between China and the former Eastern block. Following long distances and hitchhiking cross country with movements of carp, it rapidly escaped and colonised local waters, dominating communities in ponds and lakes.

“The gudgeon’s stealth invasion of the world started in the 1950’s with the end of the Chinese civil war (from around 1840 to 1949) which had restricted human population mobility and trade,” said Professor Gozlan. “At that time, there was an increasing need for developing new sources of animal protein and black carp, grass carp, silver carp and big head carp were rapidly introduced from East China especially from the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River basin to many other places including Yunnan, Qinghai, Gansu and Xinjiang.

"This species had been cultured traditionally in East China for a long time with specific culturing techniques,” he continued. “These carp introductions for aquaculture, however, have been the beachhead of topmouth gudgeon’s great escape.”

During the expedition, Professor Gozlan is gathering material including live samples of Topmouth gudgeon from 33 locations covering nine major catchments. The samples will be compared to material collected from populations established from the first introduction in each country within the non-native range.

Populations will be compared for their life history traits and parasitic communities as well as their population genetic structure within native range but also across the introduced range.

Professor Rudy Gozlan’s Academic Profile - http://www.bournemouth.ac.uk/about/people_at_bu/our_academic_staff/CS/

profiles/rgozlan.html

Charles Elder | Bournemouth University (BU)
Further information:
http://www.bournemouth.ac.uk
http://www.expeditionchina2010.blogspot.com/

Further reports about: Chang Chinese herbs Gozlan Yangtze River environmental change

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht New risk factors for anxiety disorders
24.02.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers
24.02.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded after a glide flight with an Airbus A320 in ditching on the Hudson River. All 155 people on board were saved.

On January 15, 2009, Chesley B. Sullenberger was celebrated world-wide: after the two engines had failed due to bird strike, he and his flight crew succeeded...

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Safe glide at total engine failure with ELA-inside

27.02.2017 | Information Technology

Fraunhofer IFAM expands its R&D work on Coatings for protection against corrosion and marine growth

27.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>