Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cell Signaling Discovery Nominated as a Breakthrough of the Year in 2010 by Science Signaling

14.02.2011
Finding has Potential for Use in the Treatment of Cancer and Genetic Disorders

The editors of Science Signaling, a peer-reviewed scientific journal focusing on the process of basic cellular communication and development, have nominated a discovery made at UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School as one of the Signaling Breakthroughs of 2010. The discovery identifies a role for the protein kinase complex mTORC2, which works to control production and quality control of newly synthesized proteins to safeguard against abnormal cell growth that can lead to neurodegenerative disorders and cancer.

Cell signaling is a process of communication at the cellular level that manages cell activity, such as formation or repair, during the cell’s lifespan. According to the Science Signaling editorial, the kinase mTOR is an essential element in cell signaling, as it coordinates information about growth factor, energy status and nutrient availability to regulate cell growth. mTOR signals these development mechanisms through distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2.

In its research, led by Estela Jacinto, PhD, assistant professor of physiology and biophysics at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, the team showed that mTORC2 can associate with ribosomes, elements within the cell machinery that make proteins through translation of genetic information. By binding near the “birth canal” of ribosomes, mTORC2 modifies the emerging new protein to control its quality and prevent premature degradation. In the study, mTORC2 was found to control the quality of a protein, Akt that is often defective in cancer. Any disruption to the cell signaling process, including the absence of mTORC2, prohibits proper cell function and may cause cancer and other biological or physical disorders.

“Our findings imply that the functions of mTORC2 could be targeted for therapeutics against cancer and particularly for diseases that are caused by abnormal protein quality control, such as neurodegenerative and aging-related disorders.” said Dr. Jacinto.

The function of mTOR in linking protein synthesis with quality control was previously unknown until the findings of Won Jun Oh, a post-doctoral fellow, and Chang-chih Wu, a doctoral candidate, both members of the Jacinto lab and along with Dr. Jacinto, co-authors of the study, were published in the journal European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) in December 2010. The study was noted as an Editor’s Choice in the December 2010 issue of Science Signaling, which is published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

According to Science Signaling, the list of 2010 Breakthroughs of the Year was compiled as a result of nominations by members of the journal’s Editorial Board. Nominations represented the most exciting advances in signal transduction research of 2010. In its editorial, the journal said, “Although any major advance in cell signaling is fair game for inclusion, we suggested that nominators pay particular attention to unexpected developments and advances likely to open up new research directions.”

About UMDNJ-ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON MEDICAL SCHOOL
As one of the nation’s leading comprehensive medical schools, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School is dedicated to the pursuit of excellence in education, research, health care delivery, and the promotion of community health. In cooperation with Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital, the medical school’s principal affiliate, they comprise New Jersey’s premier academic medical center. In addition, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School has 34 other hospital affiliates and ambulatory care sites throughout the region.

As one of the eight schools of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey with 2,800 full-time and volunteer faculty, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School encompasses 22 basic science and clinical departments, hosts centers and institutes including The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, the Child Health Institute of New Jersey, the Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine, the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute, and the Stem Cell Institute of New Jersey. The medical school maintains educational programs at the undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate levels for more than 1,500 students on its campuses in New Brunswick, Piscataway, and Camden, and provides continuing education courses for health care professionals and community education programs.

To learn more about UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, log on to rwjms.umdnj.edu. Find us online at www.Facebook.com/RWJMS and

www.twitter.com/UMDNJ_RWJMS.

Jennifer Forbes | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.umdnj.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht A novel socio-ecological approach helps identifying suitable wolf habitats
17.02.2017 | Universität Zürich

nachricht New, ultra-flexible probes form reliable, scar-free integration with the brain
16.02.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Switched-on DNA

20.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>