Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Not Just Bleach: Hydrogen Peroxide May Tell Time for Living Cells

05.11.2009
If a circadian rhythm is like an orchestra – the united expression of the rhythms of millions of cells – a common chemical may serve as the conductor, or at least as the baton.

The chemical is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the active ingredient in color safe bleach. Produced in all animal cells, hydrogen peroxide may act as a signal for the active and resting phases of living things, new research by USC biologists suggests.

A study published in the journal PLoS ONE shows that hydrogen peroxide given to fruit flies has dramatic effects on their daily rhythms and activity levels.

“H2O2 might be functioning as a systemic signal by which rhythms are regulated within cells and between cells,” said lead author John Tower, associate professor in molecular and computational biology at the USC College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

Most people are familiar with the concept of a circadian rhythm that governs sleeping and waking. But that is not the only circadian rhythm in the body.

Many organs and tissues within the body have their own independent circadian rhythms, and they also interact to coordinate their rhythms.

Tower’s study suggests a link between metabolism – the production of energy by mitochondria, often described as the energy factories inside cells – and an animal’s daily rhythms.

Mitochondria produce hydrogen peroxide as a by-product of oxygen combustion, making the chemical a candidate signal molecule.

“This is a logical way to connect rhythms to metabolism,” Tower said.

“We know a lot about how circadian rhythms are regulated within certain cells. However, we have very little information on what signals coordinate circadian rhythms and how these rhythms are linked between metabolism and behavior.”

For the rhythms of even two cells to agree, some sort of signal has to pass between them.

Tower’s research group set out to find the signal by probing the action of an enzyme in mitochondria that converts toxic by-products of the body’s combustion process into hydrogen peroxide, itself a harmful but less toxic substance which other defenses later break down further.

Tower and his team had noticed that overexpression of the enzyme, known as superoxide dismutase (SOD), boosted the activity level of fruit flies and even increased the life span of certain genetically engineered strains.

Tower suspected that hydrogen peroxide was the key ingredient in SOD’s action.

“Hydrogen peroxide is a great candidate for a signaling molecule that would be involved in rhythms and behaviors. It’s the most stable and diffusible of the reactive oxygen species (by-products of combustion), but no one had demonstrated a role for it.”

As a test, Tower’s group administered hydrogen peroxide directly to fruit flies through feeding and injection.

The researchers observed similar effects from the direct administration of hydrogen peroxide and the over-expression of the SOD enzyme.

Both strategies increased the activity levels of adult flies. Long-term direct treatment with hydrogen peroxide suppressed daily rhythms, while SOD over-expression altered those rhythms.

Tower explained that he had not expected identical results from direct treatment versus genetic over-expression.

“I think it’s just a little too crude of an intervention, to feed them or inject them with the drug,” he said, because those effects will not be rhythmic, whereas production of hydrogen peroxide by the mitochondria and by SOD is expected to be rhythmic and to correspond to the rhythm of metabolism.

Still, the similarities in the flies’ reactions to direct treatment and to SOD over-expression suggested to the researchers that hydrogen peroxide is the crucial chemical.

“It’s a very exciting result for us that our data now start to point to hydrogen peroxide as perhaps being a relevant signaling molecule for coupling metabolism to behaviors and rhythms in the animal,” Tower said.

Hydrogen peroxide would govern rhythms inside each cell as well as between cells, Tower added.

Every cell alternates between a metabolic phase – in which it burns oxygen to make energy – and a detoxification phase in which the cell breaks down the harmful by-products of combustion.

Those rhythms must be coupled with the energy-producing activity of the mitochondria.

“Because hydrogen peroxide is produced by mitochondria as a product of metabolism, it’s a great candidate for a relevant signal that might be modulating these cellular rhythms,” Tower said.

Tower’s group was able to correlate fly activity and hydrogen peroxide concentration precisely through a unique three-dimensional movement tracking system developed by first author and doctoral student Dhruv Grover (http://uscnews2.usc.edu/newstools/detail.php?recordnum=16087).

Doctoral students Daniel Ford, Nicholas Hoe and Aysen Erdem and undergraduate Christopher Brown also contributed to the study. Simon Tavare, professor of mathematics and molecular and computational biology at USC College, designed and supervised the statistical analyses.

Read the study at
http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0007580

Carl Marziali | Newswise Science News
Further information:
http://www.usc.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht What the world's tiniest 'monster truck' reveals
23.08.2017 | American Chemical Society

nachricht Treating arthritis with algae
23.08.2017 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

What the world's tiniest 'monster truck' reveals

23.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Treating arthritis with algae

23.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Witnessing turbulent motion in the atmosphere of a distant star

23.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>