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Biomarker MIA shows presence of neurofibromas

04.07.2011
Neurofibromatosis (NF1) is a genetic condition which affects one in every 3,000 people.

The severity of symptoms can range from benign 'café au lait' patches on the skin, through small tumors under the skin and deep plexiform neurofibromas, to malignant tumors of the nerve sheath.

New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Medicine shows that a simple blood test for the protein melanoma-inhibitory activity (MIA) could be used to indicate the presence of neurofibromas even if they cannot be seen.

When researchers compared the levels of MIA from blood of patients with NF1 and unaffected controls they discovered that the patients with NF1 had much higher serum levels of MIA and that the level of MIA depended on the number and size of neurofibromas and plexiform neurofibromas the patient had. Tumor biopsies also showed an increase in MIA at the cellular level.

Dr Kolanczyk said, "Using the biomarker MIA to test for the presence and growth of plexiform neurofibromas would be an easier and cheaper way of monitoring clinical course of the patients and would allow the early detection of tumors so improving the treatment, management and outcome. Detection of deep plexiform neurofibroma is currently only possible using MRI scan and since these tumors can become malignant it is important to monitor their growth closely and detect signs of malignant transformation as early as possible."

Notes to Editors

1. MIA is a potential biomarker for tumor load in neurofibromatosis type 1
Mateusz Kolanczyk, Victor Mautner, Nadine Kossler, Rosa Nguyen, Jirko Kühnisch, Tomasz Zemojtel, Aleksander Jamsheer, Eike Wegener, Boris Thurisch, Sigrid Tinschert, Nikola Holtkamp, Su-Jin Park, Patricia Birch, David Kendler, Anja Harder, Stefan Mundlos and Lan Kluwe

BMC Medicine (in press)

Please name the journal in any story you write. If you are writing for the web, please link to the article. All articles are available free of charge, according to BioMed Central's open access policy.

Article citation and URL available on request at press@biomedcentral.com on the day of publication.

2. BMC Medicine - the flagship medical journal of the BMC series - publishes original research articles, commentaries and reviews in all areas of medical science and clinical practice. To be appropriate for BMC Medicine, articles need to be of outstanding quality, broad interest and special importance. BMC Medicine (ISSN 1741-7015) is indexed/tracked/covered by PubMed, MEDLINE, BIOSIS, CAS, EMBASE, Scopus, Current Contents, Thomson Reuters (ISI) and Google Scholar.

3. BioMed Central (http://www.biomedcentral.com/) is an STM (Science, Technology and Medicine) publisher which has pioneered the open access publishing model. All peer-reviewed research articles published by BioMed Central are made immediately and freely accessible online, and are licensed to allow redistribution and reuse. BioMed Central is part of Springer Science+Business Media, a leading global publisher in the STM sector.

Dr. Hilary Glover | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.biomedcentral.com

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