Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Bacteria Seek to Topple the Egg as Top Flu Vaccine Tool

07.12.2010
Only the fragile chicken egg stands between Americans and a flu pandemic that would claim tens of thousands more lives than are usually lost to the flu each year.

Vaccine production hinges on the availability of hundreds of millions of eggs – and even with the vaccine, flu still claims somewhere around 36,000 lives in the United States during a typical year. Now scientists have taken an important step toward ending the dominance of the oval.

In a paper published in the Dec. 6 issue of the journal Vaccine, scientists showed that an experimental flu vaccine grown entirely in bacteria – a process that bypasses the egg completely – works well in people, triggering an immune response that would protect them against the flu.

The study of 128 healthy people ages 18 to 49 at the University of Rochester Medical Center was led by John Treanor, M.D., an expert on flu vaccines who has helped lead efforts to create and test new ways to make flu vaccine more quickly and less expensively. The vaccine – which is free of bacteria itself – is made by New Jersey-based VaxInnate Inc., which funded the study.

“There are a number of problems with using eggs to produce flu vaccine,” said Treanor. “It’s a very specialized product. It’s hard to make more eggs in a hurry – you only get them as fast as hens lay them. They’re not easy to manipulate, and it can be challenging to get the flu virus to grow within an egg. The flu vaccine system would be more flexible and reliable if we didn’t have to rely on them.”

Scientists have been exploring a number of alternatives to eggs – creating doses to cover just the U.S. population requires millions of eggs that, if laid end to end, would just about encircle the continental United States.

Bacteria have not been high on the list of options, even though they have the capability of producing vaccine more quickly and less expensively than many other methods. Most efforts to use bacteria have faltered due to basic differences in the way that bacteria process proteins compared to more complex eukaryotic cells, which have a nucleus. Proteins are a crucial component of flu vaccine, and keeping the key proteins folded correctly has been a challenge in bacteria, which lack cellular machinery critical to the process.

“It was long accepted as dogma that you could not make a flu vaccine in bacteria that could stimulate a protective immune response in humans,” said Treanor. “But in this vaccine, the surface flu protein hemagglutinin was made by E.coli in such a way that it folded correctly, stimulating an authentic immune response. It’s almost surprising that this is possible.”

VaxInnate addressed the problem by focusing on just one small key protein of hemagglutinin that can be correctly refolded after synthesis in bacteria. The small protein is enough to spur the immune system because it was attached to an adjuvant – a compound designed to strengthen the vaccine by stimulating a more robust immune response. Adjuvants currently are not part of U.S. flu vaccines, though they are used in other countries and as parts of other vaccines. Usually, adjuvants are simply mixed into a vaccine, but the latest work offers a new method. A bacterial protein called flagellin was actually fused to a molecule that mimics the flu’s hemagglutinin protein – a combination designed both to draw the attention of the immune system and immediately amplify it in one step.

The amount of material in the experimental flu shot under study is just a fraction of the amount used in a licensed flu shot. The most successful tests were done with one or two micrograms of vaccine, much smaller than today’s licensed 15-microgram shot. About half of participants got a strong immune response at 1 microgram, and about 80 percent got a strong immune response at 2 micrograms.

Also taking part in the study from the Medical Center were Christine Hay, M.D., assistant professor of Medicine; nurse practitioner Carrie Nolan; and technician Theresa Fitzgerald. Authors from VaxInnate included David Taylor, Lynda Tussey, Ge Liu, Uma Kavita, Langzhou Song, and Alan Shaw.

For Media Inquiries:
Tom Rickey
(585) 275-7954
Email Tom Rickey

Tom Rickey | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.urmc.rochester.edu

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Symbiotic bacteria: from hitchhiker to beetle bodyguard
28.04.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

nachricht Nose2Brain – Better Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis
28.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Grenzflächen- und Bioverfahrenstechnik IGB

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Im Focus: Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

"The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including...

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Fighting drug resistant tuberculosis – InfectoGnostics meets MYCO-NET² partners in Peru

28.04.2017 | Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Wireless power can drive tiny electronic devices in the GI tract

28.04.2017 | Medical Engineering

Ice cave in Transylvania yields window into region's past

28.04.2017 | Earth Sciences

Nose2Brain – Better Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis

28.04.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>