Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Accurate timing of migration prolongs life expectancy in pike

01.10.2015

Animal migration is a spectacular phenomenon that has fascinated humans for long. It is widely assumed that appropriate timing of migratory events is crucial for survival, but the causes and consequences of individual variation in timing are poorly understood. New research based on migrating pike in the Baltic Sea and published in the British Ecological Society’s Journal of Animal Ecology reveals how behaviours such as punctuality, flexibility and fine-tuning influence life expectancy in fish.

Pike is a widely distributed, long-lived and large keystone predatory fish species that breeds annually after becoming mature. In the Baltic Sea, some pike display homing behaviour and repeatedly migrate to spawn in the same stream where they were born. Migrating pike in the Baltic Sea thus offers interesting and rare opportunities to gain further understanding of the causes and consequences of variation in migratory timing among and within individuals.


Two northern pike (Esox lucius) returning to spawn in the stream where they were born. They will soon emigrate back to the Baltic Sea, where individuals originating from different streams coexist.

Photo © Olof Engstedt

Tibblin and collaborators from Linnaeus University (Kalmar, Sweden) studied arrival timing across six years of more than 2000 marked pike that migrated to a small spawning stream that flowed into the southwest of the Baltic Sea.

Lead-author Dr Petter Tibblin elaborates: “results show that individual migratory timing is consistent across years and that arriving too early or too late increases mortality. Individuals also continuously fine-tune their timing with increased experience, a behaviour that is similar to the trial-and-error method used by many mammals but previously not shown for fish”.

Results also shed some new light on the long-standing and intriguing issue of whether flexibility is adaptive such that it increases fitness, a topic that recently has received increased scientific attention although it has rarely been investigated empirically.

Study co-author professor Anders Forsman says: “we demonstrate that there is variation among individuals in the degree of flexibility (adjustments in migratory timing across years) and further establish that greater flexibility at early reproductive events improves life expectancy”

This research emphasizes the complex nature of animal behaviour, and advances our understanding of migratory behaviour. Co-author professor Per Larsson concludes: “that among individual variation and within-individual flexibility in migratory timing are associated with fitness suggest that these behaviours may also influence the viability of populations in the face of a rapidly changing world, and this should be considered in management programs”.

Petter Tibblin, Anders Forsman, and Per Larsson are members of the Linnaeus University Centre for Ecology and Evolution in Microbial model Systems, EEMiS. http://lnu.se/lnuc/eemis

Anders Forsmans personal webpage: http://lnu.se/personal/anders.forsman

Read the article:
Tibblin, P., Forsman, A., Borger, T. and Larsson, P. 2015. Causes and consequences of repeatability, flexibility and individual fine-tuning of migratory timing in pike. Journal of Animal Ecology, DOI: 10.1111/1365-2656.12439

Contact information:
Petter Tibblin, PhD, e-mail: Petter.Tibblin@LNU.se; phone: +46-(0)480-44 67 45; cellular phone: +46-(0)705-52 99 37

Anders Forsman, professor, e-mail: Anders.Forsman@LNU.se; phone: +46-(0)480-44 61 73; cellular phone: +46-(0)706-27 27 38

Per Larsson, professor, e-mail: Per.Larsson@lnu.se; phone: +46-(0)480-44 73 11
Pressofficer, Jonas Tenje+46 (0) 70 308 40 75

Pressofficer: Christina Dahlgren, +46-705 72 26 56, christina.dahlgren@lnu.se

Weitere Informationen:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2656.12439/abstract Link to the article

Christina Dahlgren | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

Further reports about: Ecology cellular phone timing of migration

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht MicroRNA helps cancer evade immune system
19.09.2017 | Salk Institute

nachricht Ruby: Jacobs University scientists are collaborating in the development of a new type of chocolate
18.09.2017 | Jacobs University Bremen gGmbH

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

Im Focus: Silencing bacteria

HZI researchers pave the way for new agents that render hospital pathogens mute

Pathogenic bacteria are becoming resistant to common antibiotics to an ever increasing degree. One of the most difficult germs is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a...

Im Focus: Artificial Enzymes for Hydrogen Conversion

Scientists from the MPI for Chemical Energy Conversion report in the first issue of the new journal JOULE.

Cell Press has just released the first issue of Joule, a new journal dedicated to sustainable energy research. In this issue James Birrell, Olaf Rüdiger,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

New quantum phenomena in graphene superlattices

19.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A simple additive to improve film quality

19.09.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>