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A step forward in regenerating and repairing damaged nerve cells

22.11.2012
IRCM researchers discover a nerve cell’s internal clock
A team of IRCM researchers, led by Dr. Frédéric Charron, recently uncovered a nerve cell’s internal clock, used during embryonic development. The discovery was made in collaboration with Dr. Alyson Fournier’s laboratory at the Montreal Neurological Institute. Published today in the prestigious scientific journal Neuron, this breakthrough could lead to the development of new tools to repair and regenerate nerve cells following injuries to the central nervous system.

Researchers in Dr. Charron’s laboratory study neurons, which are the nerve cells that make up the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). They want to better understand how neurons navigate through the developing embryo to arrive at their correct destination.

“To properly form neural circuits, developing axons (long extensions of neurons that form nerves) follow external signals to reach the right targets,” says Dr. Frédéric Charron, Director of the Molecular Biology of Neural Development research unit at the IRCM. “We discovered that nerve cells also have an internal clock, which changes their response to external signals as they develop over time.”

For this research project, IRCM scientists focused on the Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) protein, which gives cells important information for the embryo to develop properly and plays a critical role in the development of the central nervous system.

“It is known that axons follow the Shh signal during their development,” explains Dr. Patricia Yam, research associate in Dr. Charron’s laboratory and first author of the study. “However, axons change their behaviour once they reach this protein, and this has been a mystery for the scientific community. We found that a nerve cell’s internal clock switches its response to external signals when it reaches the Shh protein, at which time it becomes repelled by the Shh signal rather than following it.”

“Our findings therefore showed that more than one system is involved in directing axon pathfinding during development,” adds Dr. Yam. “Not only do nerve cells respond to external signals, but they also have an internal control system. This discovery is important because it offers new possibilities for developing techniques to regenerate and repair damaged nerve cells. Along with trying to modify external factors, we can now also consider modifying elements inside a cell in order to change its behaviour.”

Injuries to the central nervous system affect thousands of Canadians every year, and can lead to lifelong disabilities. Most often caused by an accident, stroke or disease, these injuries are very difficult to repair. New tools are therefore required to repair damage to the central nervous system, including techniques that could potentially regenerate nerve cells.

"The Canadian Institutes of Health Research is delighted to support research aimed at improving the lives of individuals with damage to the brain or spinal cord," says Dr. Anthony Phillips, Scientific Director of CIHR’s Institute of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Addiction. ''Nerve cell repair and regeneration remains an important health challenge, and we believe that Dr. Charron's research findings will contribute to the solution."

About the research project
This research project was funded by grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Peter Lougheed Medical Research Foundation, the McGill Program in NeuroEngineering and the Fonds de recherche de Québec – Santé (FRQS). The article published in Neuron was a collaborative project between Dr. Charron’s team and Dr. Alyson Fournier’s laboratory at the Montreal Neurological Institute (Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery). Collaborators from the IRCM include Steves Morin, W. Todd Farmer and Léa Lepelletier.

For more information on this scientific breakthrough, please refer to the article summary published online by Neuron: www.cell.com/neuron/abstract/S0896-6273(12)00852-5.

About Dr. Frédéric Charron
Frédéric Charron obtained his PhD in experimental medicine from McGill University. He is an Associate IRCM Research Professor and Director of the Molecular Biology of Neural Development research unit. Dr. Charron is also Associate Professor-Researcher in the Department of Medicine at the Université de Montréal, and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Medicine (Division of Experimental Medicine), the Department of Biology, and the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology at McGill University. In addition, he is a member of the McGill Integrated Program in Neuroscience, the Montreal Regional Brain Tumor Research Group at the Montreal Neurological Institute, and the Centre of Excellence in Neurosciences (CENUM) at the Université de Montréal. Dr. Charron is a Research Scholar from the Fonds de recherche du Québec – Santé (FRQS). For more information, visit www.ircm.qc.ca/charron.

About the IRCM
Founded in 1967, the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal (IRCM) (www.ircm.qc.ca) is currently comprised of 37 research units in various fields, namely immunity and viral infections, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, cancer, neurobiology and development, systems biology and medicinal chemistry. It also houses three specialized research clinics, eight core facilities and three research platforms with state-of-the-art equipment. The IRCM employs 425 people and is an independent institution affiliated with the Université de Montréal. The IRCM clinic is associated to the Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM). The IRCM also maintains a long-standing association with McGill University.

About the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
CIHR is the Government of Canada's health research investment agency. CIHR's mission is to create new scientific knowledge and enable its translation into better health, more effective health services and products, and a stronger Canadian health care system. Composed of 13 Institutes, CIHR provides leadership and support to more than 14,100 health researchers and trainees across Canada.

For more information and to schedule an interview with Dr. Charron, please contact:

Julie Langelier
Communications Officer (IRCM)
julie.langelier@ircm.qc.ca
(514) 987-5555

Lucette Thériault
Communications Director (IRCM)
lucette.theriault@ircm.qc.ca
(514) 987-55

Julie Langelier | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ircm.qc.ca

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