Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Robot demonstrates human-like handwriting – researchers enable fluid writing and grasping movements

14.10.2011
Scientists at the University of Göttingen and the Bernstein Focus Neurotechnology Göttingen have developed a method allowing robots to learn fluid movements such as writing or reaching for objects.

This would allow future machines to be able to imitate handwriting, pour water into a glass or handle a dishwasher. The results were published online in the journal IEEE Transactions on Robotics.


The robotic arm perfectly mimics a sample of handwriting. © Institut für Physik 3 - Biophysik, Univ. Göttingen

Most human movements consist of a multitude of individual actions, which are connected to each other automatically. When a child learns to write, it initially guides the pen hesitantly. Over time, the child gradually learns to connect the individual letters to each other smoothly.

To date, however, machines work only through a chain of distinct motion elements. Scientists working with Prof. Dr. Florentin Wörgötter, coordinator of the Bernstein Focus Neurotechnology at the University of Göttingen, have now altered the mathematical basis of control commands in a few, but crucial, details. As a result, the robot can combine actions such as writing multiple letters connected to each other dynamically. Thus, robotic movements come much closer to the biological model than previously.

“In ten to fifteen years service robots will play a major role, so it is important that machine movement becomes more and more human-like, and thus predictable for us, so that we can work together without accidents,” explains Wörgötter.

The Minister for Science and Culture in the state of Lower Saxony, Prof. Dr. Johanna Wanka, was delighted by the capabilities of the robot demonstrated on a visit to the Bernstein Focus Neurotechnology and the Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience in Göttingen. After the Minister provided a handwritten sample, the robot mimicked it perfectly. “Now, our robot is the first to officially master ministerial handwriting," said Prof. Wörgötter with a smile. “I am excited about the scientific results obtained at this location in Göttingen and I look forward to the many new possible applications for these technologies in the field of service robotics though I will continue to write my signature myself,” states the Minister.

The mathematical method that was further developed by the Göttingen scientists is particularly characterized by the fact that it can be easily transferred to different courses of action and produces extremely smooth movements. Thus, it could make a significant contribution to the development of robots that support humans in their daily lives in the future.

The Bernstein Focus Neurotechnology Göttingen is part of the National Bernstein Network Computational Neuroscience (NNCN) in Germany. The NNCN was established by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research with the aim of structurally interconnecting and developing German capacities in the new scientific discipline of computational neuroscience. The network is named after the German physiologist Julius Bernstein (1835–1917).

Original Publication: Kulvicius T, Ning K, Tamosiunaite M, Wörgötter F (2011): Joining movement sequences: modified dynamic movement primitives for robotics applications exemplified on handwriting. IEEE Transactions on Robotics, doi: 10.1109/TRO.2011.2163863; September 1, 2011.

Contact:
Prof. Dr. Florentin Wörgötter
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen & Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience Göttingen
III. Institute of Physics - Biophysics
Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen
Phone: +49 (0)551 39-10760, Fax +49 (0)551 39-7720
E-Mail: worgott@physik3.gwdg.

Johannes Faber | idw
Further information:
http://www.uni-goettingen.de/
http://www.nncn.de/
http://www.bccn-goettingen.de/Groups/GroupCN

More articles from Interdisciplinary Research:

nachricht 36 big data research projects
21.02.2017 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

nachricht Coastal wetlands excel at storing carbon
01.02.2017 | University of Maryland

All articles from Interdisciplinary Research >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>