Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

European Commission is world's largest public investor in nanotechnology

14.09.2007
With €1.4 billion allocated to 550 projects in the field of nanosciences and nanotechnology, the EU's 6 th Research Framework Programme accounts for one-third of total public funding for nanotechnology and is the world's largest single funding agency worldwide for this exciting field.

A recent report, focused on the implementation of the 2005 Action Plan for Nanotechnology, shows the strategic importance of nanotechnology, an area of recognised European leadership, and the contribution this field of science can make to the quality of life and economic well-being of Europeans, for example through revolutionary activities in key areas such as materials, electronics and medicine. The European Commission is committed to an integrated and responsible approach to developing nanotechnologies, taking into account all aspects – safety, acceptance by society, ethical implications and so on.

"Nanotechnology is an area where Europe is an acknowledged world leader. This is an opportunity we must grasp with both hands," says European Science and Research Commissioner Janez Potocnik. "The successful development of nanotechnologies will depend on a responsible approach to addressing issues such as safety for humans and animals, the ethics of future developments and society's debate about these. The European Commission has already shown in this first phase that it is able to steer this course."

Nanotechnology is a broad term that has applications in many fields of science – biology, electronics, materials, medicine – but broadly encompasses research into the principles and properties arising at the nano-level,that is the level of atoms and molecules. These can differ significantly from the larger scale, which is why this new area of science has emerged. Nanotechnologies make possible better products and services, helping to improve citizens' quality of life and environment. Many nanotechnology-based products are already on the market, including new electronics and chemistry components, intelligent textiles, novel functional surface coatings, new diagnostic and drug delivery systems, breakthroughs in tissue regeneration, and ever faster and more accurate sensors.

The EU's 6 th Research Framework Programme provided €1.4 billion to 550 projects, accounting for on-third of total public funding for nanotechnology in Europe. Priority targets include fundamental and industrial research, human resources, nanotechnology-specific infrastructures, safety and communication. Although there is strong industrial participation in these projects, resulting in innovation in companies (including SMEs), more and more patents and spin-offs, and a better environment for research and industry (standards, metrology, patenting etc), private investment in the field remains behind that in the US and Japan.

Under FP7, EC funding for nanotechnologies and nanosciences is expected to increase significantly. The average yearly funding is likely to be more than double that in FP6, taking into account actions across the programme. In addition, the Risk-Sharing Financing Facility established by the Commission jointly with the European Investment Bank should provide access to new funding sources.

Beyond funding, the successful development of nanotechnologies demands an integrated and responsible approach. European citizens should benefit from nanotechnology, while being protected from possible adverse impacts. Commitment to ethical principles is a cornerstone of such an approach. To reach full potential, nanotechnology development must be attuned to society's expectations, making communication and dialogue an absolute priority. In addition to information activities in all Community languages for different target groups, the Commission has systematically promoted public dialogue, particularly with NGOs. It has launched an open consultation on a Code of Conduct for responsible nanotechnology research, which may lead to a Commission recommendation by the end of the year.

Similarly, assessing the safety of nanotechnology-based products and processes is a central issue for European policy, and has direct impact on their access to the market. Nanoparticles and their potential impact on health and the environment are being studied in close coordination with Member States and international bodies such as the UN, OECD and International Standards Organisation. In addition to projects specifically devoted to safety, which have received €28 million in funding so far, all nanotechnology research projects include an ethical and safety assessment component. The European Commission is currently undertaking a review of existing legislation to see whether the current regulatory framework appropriately addresses health, safety and environmental risks. Moreover, it has taken steps to establish an observatory to provide decision-makers with dynamic assessments of scientific and market developments.

Other important issues discussed in the report are the international aspects of nanotechnology development, and the need to train the new generation of nano-scientists.

Patrick Vittet-Philippe | alfa
Further information:
http://ec.europa.eu/nanotechnology/index_en.html
http://cordis.europa.eu/nanotechnology/

More articles from Interdisciplinary Research:

nachricht Lego-like wall produces acoustic holograms
17.10.2016 | Duke University

nachricht New evidence on terrestrial and oceanic responses to climate change over last millennium
11.10.2016 | University of Granada

All articles from Interdisciplinary Research >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Electron highway inside crystal

Physicists of the University of Würzburg have made an astonishing discovery in a specific type of topological insulators. The effect is due to the structure of the materials used. The researchers have now published their work in the journal Science.

Topological insulators are currently the hot topic in physics according to the newspaper Neue Zürcher Zeitung. Only a few weeks ago, their importance was...

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Researchers identify potentially druggable mutant p53 proteins that promote cancer growth

09.12.2016 | Life Sciences

Scientists produce a new roadmap for guiding development & conservation in the Amazon

09.12.2016 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

Satellites, airport visibility readings shed light on troops' exposure to air pollution

09.12.2016 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>