Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Award-winning video captures water, oil, mixing

08.03.2004


When water meets oil, it’s not like when Harry meets Sally. It’s more like a tornado. Washington University mechanical engineer Amy Shen, Ph.D., and student collaborators have made an award-winning video that shows (from left) canola oil, fuel treatment and an oil treatment mixing with water.


Shen, Roland and Alexander, the team that brought home the APS award


It looks like a tornado

A team consisting of an art student and mechanical engineers at Washington University in St. Louis has made an award-winning movie that captures for the first time the fluid mechanics phenomenon of two things that classically don’t mix, doing just that.

Amy Shen, Ph.D., assistant professor of mechanical engineering, her graduate student William Alexander and Arts & Sciences art major Sarah Roland, have photographed three different oils atop a layer of water and the consequence of what happens when water and oil are forced to react through the spin of a magnetic stir bar.



Guess what? It looks just like a tornado. Double click on the images and take a look: http://mesun4.wustl.edu/ME/faculty/aqshen/news.html

The three-minute video, set to the rock music of Soundgarden, catches canola oil, STP oil and STP oil additive doing what they don’t confess, and is so visually appealing that it won the Gallery of Fluid Motion Award at the American Physical Society’s (APS) annual meeting in November, 2003 in East Rutherford, N.J. APS holds the competition, which can be either a poster or a video, annually; Shen and her collaborators were one of 11 teams out of 88 who competed to win an award. Shen’s results will be published later in 2004 in the journal Physics of Fluids.

She recruited Roland to the project when she and two other Washington University faculty members purchased a photron PCI 128 digital high speed camera that shoots 1,000 frames per second (at 1,024 by 1,248 resolution) compared with the 30 frames per second of a typical digital camera.

"I wanted to have someone work with us who was really proficient with a camera and would value the beauty of the action," Shen said. "Sarah was invaluable."

Shen’s specialty is fluid dynamics of complex fluids, an interdisciplinary area involved in many natural and synthetic processes from hand-held sensing devices to automobiles, to biomedical equipment. The transport of fluid and heat occurs everywhere, for instance, in the environment and all living organisms. Fluids are either Newtonian — their viscosity is constant, despite perturbation — or non-Newtonian — their viscosity changes and is less easy to predict. Canola oil is Newtonian and the STP products are non-Newtonian.

The three different oils all produced different vortices, or funnels. Canola oil is the smoothest, characterized by satellite droplets, and looking like a classic tornado about to touch down; STP fuel treatment is a little rougher with irregular satellites; and the oil treatment is the most inelastic, looking like the dissolving of a funnel cloud.

"When you see the movie, everything makes sense," Shen said. "The purpose of the competition is to illustrate a fluid motion that shows originality and ability to convey the fundamental fluid transport phenomenon. The most common reaction we got was: ’I should have done that.’ I think it’s a nice educational demonstration of fundamental research with up-to-date technology."

Tony Fitzpatrick | WUSTL
Further information:
http://news-info.wustl.edu/tips/page/normal/637.html
http://mesun4.wustl.edu/ME/faculty/aqshen/news.html

More articles from Interdisciplinary Research:

nachricht 36 big data research projects
21.02.2017 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

nachricht Coastal wetlands excel at storing carbon
01.02.2017 | University of Maryland

All articles from Interdisciplinary Research >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Microhotplates for a smart gas sensor

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists unlock ability to generate new sensory hair cells

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Prediction: More gas-giants will be found orbiting Sun-like stars

22.02.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>