Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Fraunhofer IIS-A setting the pace in transactional watermarking, unveils optimized MP3 bitstream

17.08.2000


Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits, Applied Electronics IIS,the world leader in audio compression technology and Home of MP3 unveilsadvanced signal
processing technology: Advanced Watermarking technologyhelps content providers to keep track of their content and protect theirintellectual property.

Fraunhofer Bitstream Watermarking technologybundles Fraunhofer´s robust watermarking scheme with their famous suiteof high-performance audio coders by allowing direct embedding of watermarkdata (such as digital signatures) into coded music content. In this way,material can easily be personalized to any particular customer and tracedback in case of illegal proliferation. This is an important step for themusic industries and the secure digital distribution of audio files.Direct embedding of digital watermarks into coded bitstreams reduces timeand cost efforts for the companies while preserving optimum signal quality.

While Fraunhofer IIS-A had already presented the world´s firstbitstream watermarking scheme for MPEG audio coders at the AES trade showin Paris, February of 2000 (based on the MPEG-2 Advanced Audio Codingscheme), more brand new technology will be released at the upcoming AESconvention in Los Angeles, September 22-25 2000: MP3 support in the newbitstream watermarking technology now allows seamless and efficient dataembedding for the de-facto audio coding
standard on the Internet."The new bitstream watermarking systems were designed with two goalsin mind: Achieving the best possible performance of the combined codec/watermarksystem and maintaining the renowned Fraunhofer audio quality" saidChristian Neubauer, in lead of the development effort. "Much efforthas been put into rigorous listening tests and optimization of thepsychoacoustic models, taking advantage of Fraunhofer´s long-standingcodec expertise."



The Fraunhofer Institute for IntegratedCircuits, Applied Electronics IIS-A, develops microelectronic circuits,devices, and systems up to complete industrial solutions.
Fields ofapplications are information and communications technology, imaging sensortechnology, image processing, X-ray and medical technology.

Theinstitute is also the leading research laboratory in the area of audiocoding. Since the start of its audio coding work more than 10 years ago,Fraunhofer IIS-A has
participated actively in the development of audiocompression algorithms. Major parts of MPEG-1 Layer-3 (MP3), the mostpopular audio format on the Internet, have
been devised at itsheadquarters in Erlangen, Germany. The MPEG-2 Advanced Audio Coding (AAC)algorithm, which is the most efficient coding algorithm currentlyavailable, was also developed in cooperation with experts from FraunhoferIIS-A. AAC offers a 16 fold data reduction while maintaining CD quality.

Inaddition to audio coding technology, Fraunhofer IIS-A is also working ondata-hiding technologies for use in watermarking and fingerprintingsystems. Fraunhofer
IIS-A is active in international efforts to developmethods to technically manage and protect intellectual property, includingthe MPEG-4 work on Intellectual Property
Management & Protection (IPMP),the Audio Engineering Society´s (AES) activities on Internet AudioDelivery Systems and the Secure Digital Music Initiative (SDMI)
beinginitiated by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), theRecording Industry Association of Japan (RIAJ) and the InternationalFederation of the
Phonographic Industries (IFPI).

Elvira Gerhäuser |

More articles from Interdisciplinary Research:

nachricht Scientists develop machine-learning method to predict the behavior of molecules
11.10.2017 | New York University

nachricht A new method for the 3-D printing of living tissues
16.08.2017 | University of Oxford

All articles from Interdisciplinary Research >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Osaka university researchers make the slipperiest surfaces adhesive

18.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Space radiation won't stop NASA's human exploration

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Los Alamos researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>