Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New Stem Cell Program : Funds Awarded to Nervous System Projects and Stem Cell Bank Networks

06.09.2002

Nine projects and two extensive networks will share 44 million Swedish kronor (SEK) in research funds, the first grants awarded by Sweden’s new Joint Program on Stem Cell Research. Of nearly 50 applicants, 11 received grants. Several of the funded projects address the nervous system. Diabetes is another area to receive funding. - The entire stem cell field is on the threshold of development. These grants are extremely important for advancing research so that we can identify areas with the greatest potential, says Harriet Wallberg-Henriksson, General Secretary of the Scientific Council for Medicine at the Swedish Research Council. In the long run, it is our hope that stem cells can be used to cure various diseases. However, intensive research is needed before we can say if, and when, this will be possible.

An international panel of five leading experts, all active researchers in the stem cell field, reviewed and evaluated the grant proposals. Selection was based on the quality of the proposals. Projects selected, project leaders, and funds granted (SEK) for a 3-year period (alphabetical order by surname of project leader): - Cellular and molecular characterization of stem cell proliferation and differentiation / Ernest Arenas, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm: 2.7 million SEK - Survival of neural stem cells and their differentiated progeny in vitro and in vivo / Patrik Brundin, Lund University: 1.5 million SEK - Genome-wide analysis of genetic reprogramming in neuronal stem cell development / Carlos F Ibáñez, Karolinska Institute: 3 million SEK - Genetic control of hematopoietic stem cell fate: Therapeutic implications / Stefan Karlsson, Lund University: 2.4 million SEK - Notch signalling and stem cell differentiation / Urban Lendahl, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm: 3 million SEK - Cancer cells, are they stem cells without control? / Monica Nistér, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm: 2.4 million SEK - Epigenetic reprogramming and transdifferentiation of somatic cells / Rolf Ohlsson, Uppsala University: 3 million SEK - Differentiation of functional pancreatic beta cells from human embryonic stem cells / Henrik Semb, Göteborg University: 1.8 million SEK - Utilization of endothelial-derived signals for differentiating embryonic stem cells to insulin producing cells / Michael Welsh, Uppsala University: 1.8 million SEK - (network) Network for somatic stem cell plasticity / Sten-Eirik Jacobsen, Lund University: 12 million SEK - (network) Derivation, characterization, and banking of human embryonic stem cells / Lars Ährlund-Richter, Karolinska Institutet: 10.5 million SEK

Background Financing for the grants is based an agreement totaling 75 million SEK which the Swedish Research Council reached in the Spring of 2002 with the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) in the United States and the Swedish Diabetes Association Research Foundation. Over a 5-year period, JDRF will contribute 50 million SEK, the Swedish Research Council will contribute 20 million SEK, and the Swedish Diabetes Association Research Foundation will contribute 5 million SEK. The program includes 5 million SEK earmarked for research on ethical and legal issues. These grants will be awarded later in the autumn.

Kajsa Eriksson | AlphaGalileo
Further information:
http://www.vr.se

More articles from Interdisciplinary Research:

nachricht NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies
20.10.2017 | Naval Research Laboratory

nachricht Integrated lab-on-a-chip uses smartphone to quickly detect multiple pathogens
19.10.2017 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

All articles from Interdisciplinary Research >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>