Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Video emergency call system “NurseEye”

25.02.2014
According to estimates of the German Federal Statistical Office about 23 million people in Germany will be 65 or older in 2050. That corresponds to 33 percent of our population. Nearly 52,000 people will reach the age of 100, and this figure is set to increase. The need for skilled care and nursing staff is constantly growing; to meet it is becoming ever more difficult. Modern technology will, in future, be able to support hospital and nursing home personnel in keeping an eye on corridors and traffic routes in order to respond immediately in an emergency.

According to estimates of the German Federal Statistical Office about 23 million people in Germany will be 65 or older in 2050. That corresponds to 33 percent of our population. Nearly 52,000 people will reach the age of 100, and this figure is set to increase. The need for skilled care and nursing staff is constantly growing; to meet it is becoming ever more difficult. Modern technology will, in future, be able to support hospital and nursing home personnel in keeping an eye on corridors and traffic routes in order to respond immediately in an emergency.


The camera system recognizes a simple pointing gesture and automatically sends a message to staff, for example on a mobile device.

Photo: Manfred Zentsch © Fraunhofer IOSB 2013

After visiting hours the station hall is suddenly silent and empty. The ward round has just been completed and most patients are in their rooms.

From now on, the number of carers is reduced to minimum levels for the late and night shift. A single carer is now responsible for up to four stations. But he is supported by a new intelligent video surveillance system. The long stretches of corridors and passages between stations are fitted with video cameras. 

The images they record are analyzed by special software, which automatically detects people that have fallen or are in distress. Hospital staff or other persons have no access to these videos. When the camera system detects an emergency, the nearest employee receives an alarm signal on their mobile device. Only if he acknowledges the alarm and thereby takes charge of the situation can he access the video footage from the camera and is shown the exact location of the event on a map. If an alarm is not acknowledged within a certain time, other stations or employees are notified.

Privacy is a top priority

Video surveillance in hospitals, of course, requires a high level of data protection as well as the acceptance of those involved. Fraunhofer IOSB is aware of this and specifically deals with the possible concerns of those affected: All cameras are equipped with monitors that show how the collected data is processed. As long as no emergency has been detected the data is analyzed only by the special software, so that patients and hospital staff can rest assured that their privacy is protected. When an emergency is detected the monitor image changes so that the distressed patient can see that a call for assistance has already been sent.

Once the alarm has been acknowledged by a carer, the system establishes a video link between assisting employee and patient. This allows the employee to assess the situation and calm the patient. The patient, in turn, knows that help is on its way and that their data has been sent only to a known person.

At CeBIT 2014 the video system will be presented to the public for the first time. It can be seen at the Fraunhofer stand in Hall 9.

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.iosb.fraunhofer.de/servlet/is/43400/

Dipl.-Ing. Sibylle Wirth | Fraunhofer-Institut

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht World first demo of labyrinth magnetic-domain-optical Q-switched laser
28.07.2016 | Toyohashi University of Technology

nachricht New movie screen allows for glasses-free 3-D
26.07.2016 | Massachusetts Institute of Technology, CSAIL

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Self-assembling nano inks form conductive and transparent grids during imprint

Transparent electronics devices are present in today’s thin film displays, solar cells, and touchscreens. The future will bring flexible versions of such devices. Their production requires printable materials that are transparent and remain highly conductive even when deformed. Researchers at INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials have combined a new self-assembling nano ink with an imprint process to create flexible conductive grids with a resolution below one micrometer.

To print the grids, an ink of gold nanowires is applied to a substrate. A structured stamp is pressed on the substrate and forces the ink into a pattern. “The...

Im Focus: The Glowing Brain

A new Fraunhofer MEVIS method conveys medical interrelationships quickly and intuitively with innovative visualization technology

On the monitor, a brain spins slowly and can be examined from every angle. Suddenly, some sections start glowing, first on the side and then the entire back of...

Im Focus: Newly discovered material property may lead to high temp superconductivity

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory have discovered an unusual property of purple bronze that may point to new ways to achieve high temperature superconductivity.

While studying purple bronze, a molybdenum oxide, researchers discovered an unconventional charge density wave on its surface.

Im Focus: Mapping electromagnetic waveforms

Munich Physicists have developed a novel electron microscope that can visualize electromagnetic fields oscillating at frequencies of billions of cycles per second.

Temporally varying electromagnetic fields are the driving force behind the whole of electronics. Their polarities can change at mind-bogglingly fast rates, and...

Im Focus: Continental tug-of-war - until the rope snaps

Breakup of continents with two speed: Continents initially stretch very slowly along the future splitting zone, but then move apart very quickly before the onset of rupture. The final speed can be up to 20 times faster than in the first, slow extension phase.phases

Present-day continents were shaped hundreds of millions of years ago as the supercontinent Pangaea broke apart. Derived from Pangaea’s main fragments Gondwana...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2016: 7th Conference on the Art, Technology and Theory of Digital Games

29.07.2016 | Event News

GROWING IN CITIES - Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Urban Gardening

15.07.2016 | Event News

SIGGRAPH2016 Computer Graphics Interactive Techniques, 24-28 July, Anaheim, California

15.07.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Vortex laser offers hope for Moore's Law

29.07.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Novel 'repair system' discovered in algae may yield new tools for biotechnology

29.07.2016 | Life Sciences

Clash of Realities 2016: 7th Conference on the Art, Technology and Theory of Digital Games

29.07.2016 | Event News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>