Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Streamlined asset management takes flight

09.06.2011
Software originating at A*STAR that optimizes the flow of resources is enabling the aerospace and semiconductor manufacturing sectors to stay lean and flexible.

A single aeroplane contains roughly four million individual parts, and successfully keeping entire fleets in the air requires easy and efficient access to spare components. This demanding process is managed by companies specializing in maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO).

Managing these resources without guesswork is now possible using a software system called D-SIMSPAIR, which was developed by the company D-SIMLAB Technologies—a spin-off from the A*STAR Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology (SIMTech).

“D-SIMSPAIR is a system that is able to portray spare parts inventory networks in a high-fidelity simulation model and also comprises an engine to rapidly optimize inventory quantities and allocations,” explains Peter Lendermann, CEO and co-founder of D-SIMLAB. By providing a more comprehensive alternative to the simple mathematical models that were previously the industry standard, D-SIMSPAIR helps companies trim costs while offering the flexibility needed to rapidly implement changes.

Today, D-SIMSPAIR is used by MRO companies supporting aircraft manufactured by Airbus, Boeing, Embraer and Bombardier. In 2010, the company formalized an agreement with Airbus that makes D-SIMSPAIR the platform of choice for optimizing materials and logistics for both present and future Airbus aircraft. Most recently, D-SIMLAB was recognized for its innovations by the technology industry magazine Red Herring, which designated the company as one of its Global Top 100 Tech Startups for 2010.

D-SIMLAB got its start in 2006, prior to the commercial launch of the Airbus A380. In an effort to streamline its spare-parts management strategy for the new aircraft, a Singapore-based MRO company consulted Lendermann’s research team at SIMTech. The researchers had been working on simulation-based tools designed to help companies make strategically sound decisions related to the management of resources distributed around the world.

“We’d seen the need for novel decision-support tools to enable better asset management, but also realized that sufficient scalability could only be achieved by taking a global-scale approach,” says Lendermann.

In partnership with his SIMTech colleagues Gan Boon Ping and Nirupam Julka, Lendermann subsequently parlayed the team’s efforts into the launch of D-SIMLAB. Their first software product was designed to assist aerospace asset management, based on a simulation engine that was subsequently incorporated into D-SIMSPAIR. It proved to be a powerful tool for the aerospace industry.

In parallel, D-SIMLAB incorporated the same simulation engine into a software platform for the semiconductor-manufacturing industry, D-SIMCON, which is now being used by companies in Singapore and Germany. According to Lendermann, these businesses are also gaining considerable efficiency in their manufacturing processes through the use of D-SIMLAB software. “They can react to changes in demand and operational conditions on the shop floor much faster than what is possible with conventional software tools,” he says. “This enables lower cycle times and higher capacity utilization, again leading to multi-million dollar cost savings.”

D-SIMLAB has grown rapidly in the past five years. Lendermann and colleagues, however, foresee considerable expansion as more companies recognize the advantages of using such simulation-based systems to accurately model the dynamics of their global networks, which minimizes waste and delays and ensures that essential resources are consistently in the appropriate place at the appropriate time.

About D-SIMLAB

D-SIMLAB Technologies was established in 2006 as a spin-off from the A*STAR Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology with the aim of developing, marketing and delivering high-performance simulation-based decision support solutions that enable corporations to realize significant cost savings. D-SIMLAB is now a leading provider of high-end simulation-based decision support solutions for the aerospace and semiconductor manufacturing industries.

About the Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology

The Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology (SIMTech) develops high-value manufacturing technology and human capital to enhance the competitiveness of Singapore's manufacturing industry. SIMTech has completed more than 900 projects with more than 500 companies, big and small, in the electronics, semiconductor, precision engineering, medical technology, aerospace, automotive, marine, logistics and other sectors.

Lee Swee Heng | Research asia research news
Further information:
http://www.d-simlab.com/
http://www.researchsea.com

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht NASA CubeSat to test miniaturized weather satellite technology
10.11.2017 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht New approach uses light instead of robots to assemble electronic components
08.11.2017 | The Optical Society

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

Im Focus: Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications.

Future quantum computers will be able to solve problems where conventional computers fail today. We are still far away from any large-scale implementation,...

Im Focus: Wrinkles give heat a jolt in pillared graphene

Rice University researchers test 3-D carbon nanostructures' thermal transport abilities

Pillared graphene would transfer heat better if the theoretical material had a few asymmetric junctions that caused wrinkles, according to Rice University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA detects solar flare pulses at Sun and Earth

17.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

NIST scientists discover how to switch liver cancer cell growth from 2-D to 3-D structures

17.11.2017 | Health and Medicine

The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change

17.11.2017 | Studies and Analyses

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>