Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Smoother sailing through sharing

29.01.2015

Mathematical analysis reveals how to maximize access to mobile networks by seamlessly ‘offloading’ traffic to smaller Wi-Fi and cellular systems

Data-intense multimedia applications are stretching cellular network capacities to their limits, but A*STAR researchers have developed a strategy to ease this burden using ‘data offloading’1. By using high-level computational algorithms to investigate data transfer between cellular base stations and ‘complementary’ setups such as home Wi-Fi systems, the team identified optimal ways to satisfy user demands across multiple, heterogeneous networks.


Using Wi-Fi access points to deliver content to mobile devices can significantly boost the speed and capacity of wireless networks.

© CurvaBezier/iStock/Thinkstock

Wi-Fi networks and small, low-power femtocell and picocell cellular antennas are inexpensive, simple to install, and highly compatible with existing smartphones and tablets. For these reasons, mobile operators consider data offloading to these complementary networks as a more feasible way to expand capacity than installing obtrusive infrastructure or bidding for new frequency spectra.

Chin Keong Ho and Sumei Sun from the A*STAR Institute of Infocomm Research in Singapore and colleagues probed one of the biggest obstacles for implementing this sharing technique: deciding when and how much data to offload from the primary network. “Many parameters, such as user requirements and cellular coverage, can affect the real-time performance of the base station,” says Ho. “The dynamics of network and user traffic make optimal offloading decisions very challenging.”

Ho notes that the loads, or demand for cellular service, of networks using data offloading are coupled through complex, nonlinear relationships. For example, increasing the load on one base station can produce interference with another base station. To maintain the same quality of service, the second base station may have to increase its load or power — subtle changes that can ripple through the combined Wi-Fi and cellular networks.

To resolve these problems, the team developed a simple but accurate model to describe a network of base stations that can interfere with each other and a series of complementary cells that can accept excess data. They then employed advanced mathematical tools to produce a load-coupled equation that characterized and optimized the data-sharing network in detail.

As a result, the team could suggest potential strategies. “One interesting finding is that for certain networks, it is impossible to satisfy user demands no matter how large the powers of the base stations,” says Ho. “Consequently, data offloading is the only means to serve the users — a finding that highlights the fundamental importance of this approach.”

The researchers believe that their load-coupling model could find practical use by determining the optimal number of small cells or Wi-Fi access points in an offloading system. Furthermore, their equations could ‘future-proof’ mobile networks by analyzing performance degradation as user requirements inevitably change.

The A*STAR-affiliated researchers contributing to this research are from the Institute for Infocomm Research


Reference
Ho, C. K., Yuan, D. & Sun, S. Data offloading in load coupled networks: A utility maximization framework. IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications 13, 1921–1931 (2014). | article

A*STAR Research | ResearchSEA
Further information:
http://www.research.a-star.edu.sg/research/7164
http://www.researchsea.com

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Information integration and artificial intelligence for better diagnosis and therapy decisions
24.05.2017 | Fraunhofer MEVIS - Institut für Bildgestützte Medizin

nachricht World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world
18.05.2017 | RMIT University

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

Information integration and artificial intelligence for better diagnosis and therapy decisions

24.05.2017 | Information Technology

CRTD receives 1.56 Mill. Euro BMBF-funding for retinal disease research

24.05.2017 | Awards Funding

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>