Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Smart little gizmo even smarter

07.07.2010
With the help of smart RFID technology, things, animals, and people can be identified remotely, and the information can be sent and stored in databases. Now the method will be even smarter thanks to research Björn Nilsson at Halmstad University in Sweden, who is presenting solutions that make this technology more effective and more energy efficient. In fact, as much as 60 percent more efficient.

RFID stands for "Radio Frequency Identification" and is about identifying something remotely with the help of wireless technology. A product is provided with a tag – or a label – which in turn has a unique identity number. When a tag passes a reader, the tag is read, and the number is registered.

RFID tags are found on masses of items in a great number of different areas where someone wants to trace, identify, and store information. Business like logistics, transportation, and animal husbandry can be made considerably more efficient with the aid of more modern tags.

Thanks to Björn Nilsson’s research, there is now a solution that makes the technology even more effective and, what’s more, more energy efficient. He has developed a protocol, that is, rules for communication between readers and tags, for so-called active RFID tags that entail that the use of energy is reduced and batteries last longer. This means that it is now possible to produce simpler and thereby cheaper tags.

Today’s active tags have been relatively limited since they have been energy-consuming and expensive to produce. There is a great demand for more energy-efficient tags with longer lives. But there’s another snag. If multiple tags pass a reader at the same time, it might be that all tags are not read then and there.

“This is what it’s all about. They can’t ‘interrupt’ each other. The talk needs to be organized. You also want the tags to use as little energy as possible. This is what my research is about: how readers and multiple tags talk to each other at the same time, effectively and without causing confusion,” explains Björn Nilsson.

The next step is to develop an active tag with a single circuit. Björn Nilsson is already working on this. Together with his colleague Emil Nilsson at Halmstad University, he is running a project where Björn’s job is to see to it that readers and tags communicate with each other, while Emil is developing the electronics to make it all more efficient.

Early this summer Björn Nilsson, together with his thesis director at Chalmers University of Technology, Lars Bengtsson, and his colleague Emil Nilsson at Halmstad University, presented this research at one of the world’s largest RFID conferences in China. Their paper was selected as one of the eight best at the conference in China.

“We’re very competitive in this field at Halmstad University,” says Björn Nilsson.

The dissertation is titled Energy Efficient Protocols for Active RFID and was submitted to Chalmers in June. The research work was carried out at Halmstad University and the company Free2Move.

Contact with Björn Nilsson: bjorn.nilsson@hh.se

Lena Lundén | idw
Further information:
http://publications.lib.chalmers.se/cpl/record/index.xsql?pubid=120356

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Efficient time synchronization of sensor networks by means of time series analysis
24.01.2017 | Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt

nachricht Ultra-precise chip-scale sensor detects unprecedentedly small changes at the nanoscale
18.01.2017 | The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists spin artificial silk from whey protein

X-ray study throws light on key process for production

A Swedish-German team of researchers has cleared up a key process for the artificial production of silk. With the help of the intense X-rays from DESY's...

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Breaking the optical bandwidth record of stable pulsed lasers

24.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Choreographing the microRNA-target dance

24.01.2017 | Life Sciences

Spanish scientists create a 3-D bioprinter to print human skin

24.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>