Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


SDSC Enables Large-Scale Data Sharing Using Globus


The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California, San Diego, has implemented a new feature of the Globus software that will allow researchers using the Center’s computational and storage resources to easily and securely access and share large data sets with colleagues.

In the era of “Big Data”-based science, accessing and sharing of data plays a key role for scientific collaboration and research. Among SDSC users there is a need to share datasets, which can be large, with collaborators who may not have accounts on SDSC resources. The new Globus feature addresses this need.

Described as a “dropbox for science”, Globus is already widely used by resource providers and users who need a secure and reliable way to transfer files. SDSC is the first supercomputer center in the National Science Foundation’s XSEDE (eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment) program to offer the new and unique Globus sharing service.

While SDSC has been offering file transfer capability via Globus to users for several years, the Center is now providing a number of Globus Plus accounts via a Globus Provider plan to selected users free of charge so that they can allow their collaborators, including those who don't have an account on SDSC clusters, to access (read and write to their shared file space) data on SDSC resources.

... more about:
»Discovery »Enables »SDSC »Sharing »XSEDE »crucial »resources »unique

SDSC staff will issue these accounts based on researchers’ needs for sharing data with their collaborators, such as if they are part of a larger collaboration where data sharing becomes crucial. Separately, researchers will be able to purchase a Globus Plus account from Globus directly, with subscriptions currently priced at $7/month or $70/year.

“Integrating the Globus sharing capability into SDSC’s widely used data-intensive computing and storage systems that include Gordon, Trestles, and Data Oasis is important because it allows researchers and resource providers to hand off the challenges of data sharing and movement to a hosted service that manages the entire process, while also monitoring performance and providing status reports,” said Amit Majumdar, director of SDSC's Data Enabled Scientific Computing division.

“Big data has become an integral part of the research landscape, and with that comes the challenge of extracting meaningful value from those massive data sets,” said SDSC Director Michael Norman. “That process is often done through multi-site collaborations. With SDSC at the forefront of big data management and expertise, enabling Globus sharing on our high-performance compute and storage systems lets scientists focus on their research, and not be distracted by challenges associated with sharing data or having to seek time-consuming IT help. I view Globus data sharing as a way to reach a broader audience of researchers beyond those who do the simulations.”

Rick Wagner, manager of SDSC’s HPC Systems group, and Mahidhar Tatineni, manager of SDSC’s User Services group, have been working with Globus staff to install Globus software on SDSC’s GridFTP servers and test its various features. Based on their experience, they expect SDSC users to rapidly adopt the software for data sharing because of its ease of use. SDSC users from domain sciences such as genomics, economics, and astrophysics are already starting to use Globus to share research data with their collaborators.

“We are excited to see SDSC become the first XSEDE resource provider to offer Globus sharing, and we will work with the SDSC team to increase adoption of the service and facilitate enhanced scientific collaboration among their users,” said Steve Tuecke, Globus project co-lead. “As an early Globus Provider plan subscriber, we appreciate SDSC’s support in helping Globus become a self-sustaining service for all researchers.”

To start using the Globus sharing feature, users who hold a Globus Plus account at SDSC need to follow the instructions provided here

Full details on the sharing service are provided here.

Jan Zverina | newswise
Further information:

Further reports about: Discovery Enables SDSC Sharing XSEDE crucial resources unique

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Laser process simulation available as app for first time
23.11.2015 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

nachricht Powering the next billion devices with Wi-Fi
19.11.2015 | University of Washington

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Lactate for Brain Energy

Nerve cells cover their high energy demand with glucose and lactate. Scientists of the University of Zurich now provide new support for this. They show for the first time in the intact mouse brain evidence for an exchange of lactate between different brain cells. With this study they were able to confirm a 20-year old hypothesis.

In comparison to other organs, the human brain has the highest energy requirements. The supply of energy for nerve cells and the particular role of lactic acid...

Im Focus: Laser process simulation available as app for first time

In laser material processing, the simulation of processes has made great strides over the past few years. Today, the software can predict relatively well what will happen on the workpiece. Unfortunately, it is also highly complex and requires a lot of computing time. Thanks to clever simplification, experts from Fraunhofer ILT are now able to offer the first-ever simulation software that calculates processes in real time and also runs on tablet computers and smartphones. The fast software enables users to do without expensive experiments and to find optimum process parameters even more effectively.

Before now, the reliable simulation of laser processes was a job for experts. Armed with sophisticated software packages and after many hours on computer...

Im Focus: Quantum Simulation: A Better Understanding of Magnetism

Heidelberg physicists use ultracold atoms to imitate the behaviour of electrons in a solid

Researchers at Heidelberg University have devised a new way to study the phenomenon of magnetism. Using ultracold atoms at near absolute zero, they prepared a...

Im Focus: Climate Change: Warm water is mixing up life in the Arctic

AWI researchers’ unique 15-year observation series reveals how sensitive marine ecosystems in polar regions are to change

The warming of arctic waters in the wake of climate change is likely to produce radical changes in the marine habitats of the High North. This is indicated by...

Im Focus: Nanocarriers may carry new hope for brain cancer therapy

Berkeley Lab researchers develop nanoparticles that can carry therapeutics across the brain blood barrier

Glioblastoma multiforme, a cancer of the brain also known as "octopus tumors" because of the manner in which the cancer cells extend their tendrils into...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

Gluten oder nicht Gluten? Überempfindlichkeit auf Weizen kann unterschiedliche Ursachen haben

17.11.2015 | Event News

Art Collection Deutsche Börse zeigt Ausstellung „Traces of Disorder“

21.10.2015 | Event News

Siemens Healthcare introduces the Cios family of mobile C-arms

20.10.2015 | Event News

Latest News

Siemens offers concrete solution portfolio for Industrie 4.0 with Digital Enterprise

24.11.2015 | Trade Fair News

Compact, rugged, three-phase power supplies for worldwide use

24.11.2015 | Trade Fair News

Sensor sees nerve action as it happens

24.11.2015 | Life Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>