Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Improving your swing

14.05.2007
The 61 million golfers in the world can look forward to a new training facility.

Golfers who wish to improve their skills often use video filming in order to study their balance and correct their movements. However, an optimal stroke deals with a lot more than just balance.

”We ’take a step back’ and make the invisible visible, and focus on the forces leading to good balance.”

Those are the words of Kristian Rathe, General Manager of the company Initial Force AS which has developed a so-called force platform custom-made for golf training. The company is located in NTNU’s Innovation Centre at Gløshaugen in Trondheim and cooperates closely with the Programme in Human Movement Sciences at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

The first prototype of the platform is currently being tested in NTNU’s movement analysis laboratory.

Force platforms are not a new invention. Ski jumping, shooting and javelin throw are sport branches that have benefited from such platforms. But this one is custom-made for golfers.

Seeing the invisible
The system, named Swing Catalyst, consists of two main components working together: the force platform and video analysis software.

The golf player enters the platform – which can be individually adjusted – and strikes the ball. The platform registers the golfers’ every movement, and a camera films the swing of the stroke. The platform contains multiple load cells – points that register all forces involved between the feet and the ground. It also registers the body’s rotating movement in detail as the club is swung. The information is added to the video image as easily understood colour markings.

”What the platform registers is impossible to see with the naked eye and cannot be caught using only a video camera,” explains Steinar Bråten, former trainer for Norway’s national ski jumping team, and co-owner of the company. “These details are important when creating the best starting point for the stroke. And if you manage to do a particularly good stroke, you can store this movement and try to recreate it.”

Large market

Initial Force cooperates with the product development company Mechatron on the design of the platform, to ensure industrial production suitability. The main target group is golf instructors internationally. On a world basis there are 61 million golfers and 62,000 instructors, and the company has great faith in a few thousand of these wanting their product. They estimate the cost of the first version to NOK 200,000 and gradually decreasing to around NOK 100,000.

Kristian Rathe does not think the price will scare people off in view of the fact that golf simulators used for entertainment cost between NOK 500,000 and 700,000.

The idea was first tested through the Take Off programme at NTNU’s Centre for Entrepreneurship. The company has also received help with the commercialization process from NTNU Technology Transfer AS. The foundation Næringslivets Idéfond has contributed financially.

By Nina E. Tveter

Nina Tveter | alfa
Further information:
http://www.ntnu.no

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht The TU Ilmenau develops tomorrow’s chip technology today
27.04.2017 | Technische Universität Ilmenau

nachricht Five developments for improved data exploitation
19.04.2017 | Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz GmbH, DFKI

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Im Focus: Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

"The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including...

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

7th International Conference on Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics in Freiburg on April 3-5, 2017

03.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Bare bones: Making bones transparent

27.04.2017 | Life Sciences

Study offers new theoretical approach to describing non-equilibrium phase transitions

27.04.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

From volcano's slope, NASA instrument looks sky high and to the future

27.04.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>