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Nokia Siemens Networks Village Connection brings affordable GSM connectivity to rural villages in new growth markets

Nokia Siemens Networks today introduces its new solution, Village Connection, for affordable rural connectivity and coverage in new growth markets. Nokia Siemens Networks Village Connection offers an easy concept to build rural connectivity village by village, enabling an innovative franchise-based business model between an operator and local village entrepreneurs.

The Nokia Siemens Networks Village Connection solution supports GSM based voice and SMS services, including roaming and connection to the outside world. A range of value-added services can be added, such as cost-effective Internet services in villages via the Internet protocol link.

“The new Nokia Siemens Networks Village Connection benefits many people”, says Ari Lehtoranta, head of Radio Access Networks, Nokia Siemens Networks. “Our solution brings connectivity, access to mobile services and economic activity to the villages, it enables operators to extend their network coverage cost-effectively in rural areas where rolling out and operating a traditional GSM network would be too cost-intensive.”

Nokia Siemens Networks Village Connection comprises GSM access points located in villages and regional access centers. A village would typically host one access point module comprising GSM radio, power and IT hardware and software components. The access point only requires simple installation and powering can be done, for instance, by solar energy. Each access point connects to standard GSM mobile devices and autonomously handles calls within a village through local switching. Access points are connected via Internet Protocol links to a regional access center. The access center connects the villages to the main GSM core network and handles the calls between the villages.

The novel Nokia Siemens Networks Village Connection allows to transfer responsibility for network and business functions to a local level, building cost-effective connectivity village by village. It can employ local people to manage access within each village, or local entrepreneurs may license the mobile access rights for their surrounding area. The solution will be available in 2008.

Nokia Siemens Networks is committed to enabling communications in communities across the world. Advanced communication technology can play a significant role in creating a sustainable future, maintain opportunities for economic welfare and growth and reduce adverse environmental impacts. Nokia Siemens Networks' environmentally sustainable business approach has a key role in its network products and solutions.

About Nokia Siemens Networks

Nokia Siemens Networks is a leading global enabler of communications services. The company provides a complete, well-balanced product portfolio of mobile and fixed network infrastructure solutions and addresses the growing demand for services with 20,000 service professionals worldwide. The combined pro-forma net sales of €17.1 billion Euro in fiscal year 2006 make Nokia Siemens Networks one of the largest telecommunications infrastructure companies. Nokia Siemens Networks has operations in some 150 countries and is headquartered in Espoo, Finland. It combines Nokia’s Networks Business Group and the carrier related businesses of Siemens Communications.

Media Enquiries

Nokia Siemens Networks
Helena Marjaranta
Radio Access Communications
Phone : +358 (40) 581 9102

Helena Marjaranta | Nokia Siemens Networks
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