Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Helping young people to understand the world

03.04.2007
University of Nottingham researchers have won £1.1m to develop innovative technology that will boost young people’s understanding of the world, as part of a joint project with Open University researchers.

They will help 11-14-year-old children to take advantage of the very latest in hand-held computer technology — both in the classroom and at home.

The project brings together University of Nottingham and Open University experts in the fields of education, educational technology, psychology and computer science in a bid to make learning more effective. The ultimate aim is to help pupils learn the skills of modern science, taking in subjects such as the environment, natural sciences and the physical world around them.

Over the next three years, researchers will be exploring how to make the best use of new technology to help personalise the way children learn, making it more accessible and more effective.

They are exploring a new approach called ‘scripted inquiry learning’, in which pupils investigate a topic with classmates, by carrying out explorations in their homes and outside, guided by their personal computer. ‘Scripted inquiry learning’ helps pupils to get more personally involved in the learning process — aiding their understanding of the subject.

The project, a collaboration with the Open University, is funded with a grant of £1,187,891 from the Economic and Social Research Council and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. Funding was awarded as part of an initiative called ‘Technology Enhanced Learning’ as part of the national Teaching and Learning Research Programme.

The project will be led by Professor Mike Sharples, Director of the Learning Sciences Research Institute (LSRI) in the School of Education, University of Nottingham, and Professor Eileen Scanlon of the Open University.

Professor Sharples said: “We now have the opportunity to guide children in doing 21st century science beyond the classroom.

“They will be able to explore issues that matter to them, such as how to understand their bodies and keep fit, by carrying out explorations in their homes and discovery centres. Their mobile computers will coordinate the activities and help them to debate with their peers and experts.”

Co-investigators at The University of Nottingham are Professor Claire O’Malley and Dr Shaaron Ainsworth in the School of Psychology, Professor Steve Benford in the School of Computer Science & Information Technology and Dr Charles Crook in the School of Education. Other partners include Hadden Park High School in Bilborough, Nottingham, and ScienceScope, a company that develops sensing and data logging equipment.

The project aims to link classroom, home and community with the aid of software running on both pupils’ mobile and desktop computers. ‘Scripted inquiry learning’ will help them to understand themselves and the world in which they live, through a scientific process of gathering and assessing evidence, conducting experiments and engaging in informed debate.

The technology will guide pupils through dynamic projects — which can change depending on the profile and input of each individual taking part — monitored and supported by the teacher.

The activities will be based around topic themes of relevance to Key Stage 3 (Myself, My Environment, My Community) that engage young learners in investigating their bodies, their immediate environment and their wider surroundings. These topics are key elements of the new 21st century science curriculum that requires children to reason about the natural sciences as a complex system and to explore how people relate to the physical world.

Members of the project team will work with a panel of teachers and curators to develop specific scripts related to the topic themes. These will guide the learner in making links across different activities – for example reading, data collection and discussion — different technologies, and different settings in which to learn, for example home, the classroom and on school field trips.

Emma Thorne | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/public-affairs/press-releases/index.phtml?menu=pressreleases&code=HELP-58/07&create_date=30-mar-2007

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Information integration and artificial intelligence for better diagnosis and therapy decisions
24.05.2017 | Fraunhofer MEVIS - Institut für Bildgestützte Medizin

nachricht World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world
18.05.2017 | RMIT University

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

How herpesviruses win the footrace against the immune system

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA, group finds

26.05.2017 | Life Sciences

First Juno science results supported by University of Leicester's Jupiter 'forecast'

26.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>