Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Queen’s University Belfast to Create World’s Largest E-Resource for Irish Studies

13.02.2007
The world’s largest e-resource for Irish Studies is to be created by Queen’s University Belfast, making over five centuries and over 500,000 pages of Irish historical, cultural, scientific, literary and statistical resources available online, at one web address, to academics, researchers and students worldwide for the first time.

The creation of the one-stop shop for Irish Studies has been made possible as a result of a £620,000 grant from the UK’s Joint Information Services Committee (JISC) to the University’s Centre for Data Digitisation Analysis and Information Services . The grant is one of the largest awarded to any Humanities project in the history of the University and is one of only 16 winning bids from the many which applied for the £12 million made available by the JISC to create digitised resources of international importance.

Addressing a serious gap in research infrastructure in Irish Studies, the new e-resource will enable academics and students from across the globe to access materials published by the Royal Irish Academy, unique collections at The Linen Hall Library, Armagh Public Library (the Robinson Library) and Queen’s own Library Special Collections – previously only available to those able to visit each collection in person.

The technology platform for the new fully searchable e-resource will be delivered as the result of a unique collaboration with JSTOR, the academically renowned US organisation which digitises and provides access to scholarly journal archives. Over 3,000 institutions worldwide are currently registered with JSTOR and there are over 71 centres for Irish Studies in England and Wales alone. Access to the resource within Britain and Ireland will be free of charge under a new business model developed between the project team and JSTOR.

Describing the importance of the new critical mass of Irish Studies material to researchers, Dr Paul S Ell of the Centre for Data Digitisation and Analysis at Queen’s, which will be responsible for digitising every page, said: “Traditionally researchers have had to identify key journals available to them in their area of interest and browse through them in the hope that they might find papers of value. As well as at times leading to overuse of specific papers this has often represented a serious brake on scholarship.

“Now, as a result of the JISC grant and the creation of this Digital Library, we at Queen’s hope not only will researchers gain access to a wider breadth and depth of material in their area, but that they will encounter an element of serendipity in their work, leading to a major step-change in the creation of new avenues of research in the area of Irish Studies worldwide.”

Deirdre Wildy, Senior Subject Librarian in Arts and Humanities at Queen’s added: “Irish Studies at Queen’s is regarded as one of the University’s Spires of Excellence. We will now cement our Library Special Collections’ global reputation by taking our outstanding resources and those of our partners on the island of Ireland, and making them available to numerous researchers in the many centres for Irish Studies worldwide, such as UC Berkeley, The Sorbonne, University of Peru and Charles University in Prague.”

Professor James Slevin, President of the Royal Irish Academy, whose journals will now be made available online as part of the resource said: "The Royal Irish Academy is delighted to be part of this very exciting project. With Queen's expertise in digitisation and the huge success of JSTOR's platform for scholars world-wide, the Royal Irish Academy's journals will sit within an unrivalled digital collection of Irish studies material which will enable researchers to mine the rich tradition of scholarship from the island of Ireland. Clearly, the field of Irish studies will be greatly strengthened by the development of this very important digital resource.”

Adding her support to the project, Professor Ruth-Ann M. Harris, Professor of History & Irish Studies at Boston College, who was formerly a visiting scholar in Irish Studies at Queen’s in 1995 said: “Queen’s has a wealth of material, which I have utilized, have recommended to a multitude of scholars, and will continue to use. The opportunity to have these materials available for future scholars is too valuable to pass up.”

Professor David Eastwood, CEO of the Higher Education Funding Council for England welcomed the announcement saying: “The JISC Digitisation programme has been leading the way in making more widely available resources which are inaccessible or hard to access, something which is quietly but rapidly transforming education and research in this country.”

The new Digital Library by Queen’s is due for completion in 2008.

Lisa Mitchell | alfa
Further information:
http://www.qub.ac.uk

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Smart Computers
21.08.2017 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

nachricht AI implications: Engineer's model lays groundwork for machine-learning device
18.08.2017 | Washington University in St. Louis

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

What the world's tiniest 'monster truck' reveals

23.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Treating arthritis with algae

23.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Witnessing turbulent motion in the atmosphere of a distant star

23.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>