Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Monitoring devices for security and economy

04.12.2006
EUREKA project E! 2711 ARTSAFE is taking modern tagging technologies to a new level, developing an innovative system for ‘keeping tabs’ on valuable items and machinery. Exploiting a growing market, this new technology promises to prevent loss, and improve security and maintenance operations. Moreover, applicable to a variety of industry sectors, it will benefit Europe’s businesses and citizens alike.

The advent of new wireless and mobile technologies has produced a massive wave of innovative communication systems, but experts still say this is only the beginning. Radio frequency identification (RFID) is a new and ingenious method for automatically monitoring all manner of objects. It involves storing and retrieving data using devices called RFID tags, small transponders that can be attached to or incorporated into products, animals or even people.

“RFID has great potential for use in a wide variety of applications,” explains project coordinator Lucas Aahlstroem of Plefo Ab in Sweden. “Tags can be used to monitor the location and movements of high-value objects, but they can also monitor the workings of machinery, helping operators to plan more efficient and economical maintenance schedules.”

Based in Stockholm, Plefo Ab specialises in personal and material security alarm systems, and in localising protected objects using the worldwide Global Positioning System (GPS). Its UK partner, the Mannings group, supply RFID and barcode technologies, including hardware and computer systems. Together, they have developed the low-cost ARTSAFE system, comprising wireless RFID tags, a wireless tag reader, the system control computer and an alarm communication system.

No limit to possible exploitation

“These components work together in several different configurations to offer different levels of security and monitoring capacity for virtually all valuable objects,” explains Aahlstroem, “from a motorcycle helmet to the Mona Lisa to a 747 aeroplane.”

The system is suitable for virtually any indoor or outdoor environment, even places such as mines where radio signals do not propagate well and there may not be electrical power. “Multiple communication pathways, anti-jamming techniques, sophisticated encryption and multiple power sources all make it very difficult to fool our system,” says Aahlstroem.

One application now receiving particular attention is the monitoring of diesel driven pumps. “These pumps are portable and are supplied to hire companies for end user operations at building sites,” Aahlstroem explains. “Operation of hire equipment fitted with our RFID devices can be monitored in detail, providing information on overall run time, for example. This means better awareness of potential problems and better diagnostics in case of failure.”

Effective services for preventing loss and improving maintenance operations represent a great potential benefit for European businesses and citizens. The possibilities, it would seem, are limited only by the imagination, from the retail industry to museums and exhibitions, to airports and the nuclear power sector, and in corporate security and utilities.

“EUREKA is a great platform for co-operation between development teams,” says Aahlstroem. “Thanks to this project, we have had the chance to develop a product that we think is going to be a great commercial success. We have already entered into business agreements with several organisations and we see an even greater potential market to cover.”

Sally Horspool | alfa
Further information:
http://www.eureka.be/artsafe

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Information integration and artificial intelligence for better diagnosis and therapy decisions
24.05.2017 | Fraunhofer MEVIS - Institut für Bildgestützte Medizin

nachricht World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world
18.05.2017 | RMIT University

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Strathclyde-led research develops world's highest gain high-power laser amplifier

The world's highest gain high power laser amplifier - by many orders of magnitude - has been developed in research led at the University of Strathclyde.

The researchers demonstrated the feasibility of using plasma to amplify short laser pulses of picojoule-level energy up to 100 millijoules, which is a 'gain'...

Im Focus: Can the immune system be boosted against Staphylococcus aureus by delivery of messenger RNA?

Staphylococcus aureus is a feared pathogen (MRSA, multi-resistant S. aureus) due to frequent resistances against many antibiotics, especially in hospital infections. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have identified immunological processes that prevent a successful immune response directed against the pathogenic agent. The delivery of bacterial proteins with RNA adjuvant or messenger RNA (mRNA) into immune cells allows the re-direction of the immune response towards an active defense against S. aureus. This could be of significant importance for the development of an effective vaccine. PLOS Pathogens has published these research results online on 25 May 2017.

Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a bacterium that colonizes by far more than half of the skin and the mucosa of adults, usually without causing infections....

Im Focus: A quantum walk of photons

Physicists from the University of Würzburg are capable of generating identical looking single light particles at the push of a button. Two new studies now demonstrate the potential this method holds.

The quantum computer has fuelled the imagination of scientists for decades: It is based on fundamentally different phenomena than a conventional computer....

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Marine Conservation: IASS Contributes to UN Ocean Conference in New York on 5-9 June

24.05.2017 | Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New photocatalyst speeds up the conversion of carbon dioxide into chemical resources

29.05.2017 | Life Sciences

NASA's SDO sees partial eclipse in space

29.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New drug reduces transplant and mortality rates significantly in patients with hepatitis C

29.05.2017 | Statistics

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>