Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Getting a feel for the fabric – virtually

08.11.2006
You can choose garment styles, colours and sizes on the internet – but how do you know what the fabric feels like? The team in one IST project – HAPTEX – are working on an answer.

Many people consider buying garments on the internet as a timesaving and hassle-free way to replenish their wardrobes. But it can be difficult to fully assess the final product before it arrives in your postbox. The HAPTEX project team has developed a preliminary demonstrator that could eventually help buyers get a ‘virtual feel’ for sweaters, suits, lingerie et al before they make an online purchase.

“We are investigating how far it is possible to provide a user with a completely reliable sense of fabric through a virtual experience,” says project coordinator Nadia Magnenat-Thalmann of the University of Geneva.

The HAPTEX partners are working on multimodal perception of textiles in virtual environments. Their goal is to achieve, by project close in November 2007, a visual representation of virtual textiles with a haptic/tactile interface, which will allow users to 'feel' the virtual garment.

The word haptic comes from the Greek haptikos, which means ‘able to touch’. Haptics is gaining widespread acceptance as a key component in virtual reality systems, adding the sense of touch to what was once a visual-only solution.

Most existing solutions use stylus-based haptic rendering, where the user interfaces with the virtual world using a tool or stylus, giving a form of interaction that is computationally realistic on today's computers. In HAPTEX, both the visual simulation and the haptic rendering are based on the real physical properties of the textile, as measured at the source.

The project team’s final goal is to integrate two different haptic technologies: a device which can 'feel' the kinesthetic forces acting on the simulated virtual fabric, and tactile arrays on two fingertips to show the vibrotactile stimulations on the surface of the simulated fabric.

Currently, there is no comparable system either on the market or in the development stage. To integrate the visual and haptic/tactile interfaces, several significant advances in existing technology are necessary before the virtual experience can come close to simulating a real physical touch.

At IST 2006 the project will present its results so far. Visitors to the project stand will be able to see on a laptop a realistic simulation of a textile and interact with it through a haptic interface. This will provide them with a realistic simulation of touching the real textile. “They will feel the force-feedback of the fabric when interacting with it,” Magnenat-Thalmann says.

Visitors will also have the opportunity to select different virtual textiles, modify their physical properties interactively, then “see and feel the effects of the changes”. They will be able to discover haptic feedback, a highly innovative technology that has not yet reached the popular domain.

Those interested in finding out more are also invited to attend the IST 2006 networking workshop ‘HAPTEX'06 - Advanced Haptics’, which is being organised and chaired by Professor Magnenat-Thalmann.

The project is making progress, she says. “We have developed the methodology and a test bed. But we will need to conduct further research before we develop an actual product for the market.”

HAPTEX provides a platform for experts working in a variety of disciplines, enabling them to work together to reach a common goal. Research issues include challenges such as simulating sensory feedback to imitate the behaviour of textiles, developing a realistic, virtual rendering of textiles, and integrating multiple sensory feedback (haptic and tactile) to produce a consistent and physically realistic sense of the real textile.

To give an idea of the challenges involved, witness the difficulties facing one project partner in developing an efficient simulation model. The task involves a physical simulation of the garment at very high frame rates to feed the haptic/tactile devices, yet while running the rendering algorithms at a lower frame rate (typically 30 Hz) in order to interact with other applications.

If successful, HAPTEX could have many potential applications for the textile industry. However the main impact will lie in significant advances for multimodal interaction tools, techniques and know-how.

Jernett Karensen | alfa
Further information:
http://istresults.cordis.lu/

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht UT professor develops algorithm to improve online mapping of disaster areas
29.11.2016 | University of Tennessee at Knoxville

nachricht New standard helps optical trackers follow moving objects precisely
23.11.2016 | National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

Im Focus: Molecules change shape when wet

Broadband rotational spectroscopy unravels structural reshaping of isolated molecules in the gas phase to accommodate water

In two recent publications in the Journal of Chemical Physics and in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers around Melanie Schnell from the Max...

Im Focus: Fraunhofer ISE Develops Highly Compact, High Frequency DC/DC Converter for Aviation

The efficiency of power electronic systems is not solely dependent on electrical efficiency but also on weight, for example, in mobile systems. When the weight of relevant components and devices in airplanes, for instance, is reduced, fuel savings can be achieved and correspondingly greenhouse gas emissions decreased. New materials and components based on gallium nitride (GaN) can help to reduce weight and increase the efficiency. With these new materials, power electronic switches can be operated at higher switching frequency, resulting in higher power density and lower material costs.

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE together with partners have investigated how these materials can be used to make power...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

UTSA study describes new minimally invasive device to treat cancer and other illnesses

02.12.2016 | Medical Engineering

Plasma-zapping process could yield trans fat-free soybean oil product

02.12.2016 | Agricultural and Forestry Science

What do Netflix, Google and planetary systems have in common?

02.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>