Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Brave New World Of Wireless Super Gadgets To Be Revealed At IADAT Conference

20.09.2006
The future of a powerful new technology that could revolutionise the way people communicate will be revealed by Europe’s leading space company, EADS Astrium, at a conference at the University of Portsmouth.

The technology is Software Defined Radio (SDR). It promises to deliver wireless gadgets capable of doing everything from watching high-definition television to opening your garage door.

This means an SDR-enabled mobile phone could work across any country in the world. The same phone could also be used to watch high-definition, satellite or digital television, surf the internet, listen to radio, send faxes as well as act as a Global Positioning System (GPS) device.

Dr David Ndzi from the University of Portsmouth’s Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering said SDR technology would break down barriers in wireless communications technologies.

‘SDR is what one could call a Tower of Babel-type technology in that wireless devices that previously understood only one or a few languages, or standards, will suddenly be able to talk to each other freely regardless of frequency or conflicting protocols,’ Dr Ndzi said.

SDR technology works by using software-based controls that allow wireless devices to receive or transmit radio data on any frequency.

This is done via an analogue-to-digital converter that changes the signal into a digital format that can be understood and manipulated by software written into the wireless device.

Dr Ndzi said space company EADS Astrium are world leaders in space applications, including scientific exploration, civil and military Earth observation and communications, ground systems and navigation constellations.

‘We are delighted to have a leading, cutting-edge technology company such as EADS Astrium talk to us about SDR as this is a technology that will change how we communicate on every level,’ Dr Ndzi said.

Keith Bannister, Robert Gask and Francis Kinsella will deliver the company’s extended presentation at the 3rd IADAT International Conference on Telecommunications and Computer Networks at the University of Portsmouth next week, September 27-29.

The conference will also be attended by delegates from several countries who will present their latest research findings in the areas of telecommunication and computer networks.

Key industry players Xyratex (data storage and network technology) and The MathWorks (developers of MATLAB) will also run workshops.

Rajiv Maharaj | alfa
Further information:
http://www.port.ac.uk

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Japanese researchers develop ultrathin, highly elastic skin display
19.02.2018 | University of Tokyo

nachricht Why bees soared and slime flopped as inspirations for systems engineering
19.02.2018 | Georgia Institute of Technology

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

'Lipid asymmetry' plays key role in activating immune cells

20.02.2018 | Life Sciences

MRI technique differentiates benign breast lesions from malignancies

20.02.2018 | Medical Engineering

Major discovery in controlling quantum states of single atoms

20.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>