Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Personal data protection vital to future civil liberties

14.09.2006
When micro-sized sensors can enquire our business in a particular neighbourhood, and equally micro-sized agents embedded within our clothing answer on our behalf, what are the risks to our personal data? How will we safeguard our personal privacy in such a society? SWAMI project researchers aimed to find out.

Product miniaturisation is fast reaching the level where tiny, intelligent devices can be embedded into virtually any part of our environment. This is the era of ambient intelligence (Aml), where microelectro-mechanical sensors (MEMS) no larger than a grain of sand will be capable of detecting everything from light to vibrations. In an environment of continuous communication surrounding everything we do and where we go, how can our security, personal privacy and civil liberties be protected? These are the issues that the partners in the IST project SWAMI set out to examine.

Ambient intelligence is believed to hold considerable promise for Europe’s economy. Hundreds of millions of euros have already been spent in AmI research, and this high level of spend is expected to continue. While most AmI scenarios paint the promise of the future in sunny colours, there is a dark side to AmI.

“Most people would be shocked to find out just how much information they consider private is already in the public domain,” says project information coordinator David Wright of Trilateral Research & Consulting in London. “Thanks to data aggregators that gather and consolidate a wide range of information about groups – and individuals – in society, our government and commercial organisations already know a great deal about what we do and what motivates us.”

To examine the potential threat to our personal liberties, the SWAMI partners created for analysis a number of “dark scenarios”, everyday situations that indicate how personal data could be misused in a future of intelligent environments. These dark scenarios offer visions of a potential future where safeguards to personal data are inadequate or have not been put in place.

In scenario 1, a man goes off to work at his office in the security company where he is employed, while his son exploits the technology on this father’s computer at home, with all its sophisticated investigative capabilities.

In scenario 2, senior citizens on a bus tour from Italy into Germany are involved in a collision due to a malfunctioning Aml traffic control system. The accident was caused by a hacker who accessed the control system and turned all the traffic lights to green.

Scenario 3 deals with a data-aggregation company that suffers theft of the personal AmI-generated data which fuels its core business. With a dominant position in the market, the company tries to cover this up, but ends up being taken to court two years later by the individuals affected. The scenario focuses on the boardroom discussions taking place as the management tries to decide what to do.

Scenario 4 presents an AmI society as high risk, as portrayed from the studios of a morning news programme. The scenario shows an action group fighting against personal profiling; the global digital divide and related environmental concerns, and the potential vulnerabilities of crowd management and traffic control systems in an AmI environment.

According to Wright, the darkest scenario of all is the threat to our personal space. “The most disturbing aspects of this new technology are already around us today, in the steady erosion of personal privacy,” he says. “Because of threats to our society, most people are willing to compromise on their personal privacy in order to gain greater security. Yet – and this must be a serious concern – is our security actually better than before we gave up this privacy?”

He believes therefore that further safeguards to personal data are needed. The project partners came up with a lengthy list of proposed safeguards to personal data; measures that will be fundamental in a future of ambient intelligence. They believe that legislation will be necessary both at national and at European level if Aml technologies are to be implemented without endangering the fundamental liberties upon which our civilisation is built.

These safeguards need to address technical, socio-economic and legal issues. In the technical arena for example, so-called privacy-enhancing technology (PET) can be built into fourth generation mobile devices, to alert the user to any data-privacy risks present within specific surroundings. Socio-economic safeguards will need to focus on increasing user awareness of the risks, both through improved education and by encouraging journalists to comment on such issues.

In the legal arena, the partners believe that present legal frameworks will not protect individual liberties in an ambient-intelligence future. Existing personal data laws and safeguards will need strengthening to meet the challenges posed by such all-encompassing technology.

Jernett Karensen | alfa
Further information:
http://istresults.cordis.lu/

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht New software speeds origami structure designs
12.10.2017 | Georgia Institute of Technology

nachricht Seeing the next dimension of computer chips
11.10.2017 | Osaka University

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Osaka university researchers make the slipperiest surfaces adhesive

18.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Space radiation won't stop NASA's human exploration

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Los Alamos researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>