Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

EU quantum information research could transform the power of computing

04.08.2006
Although presently a very young field, Quantum Information Science and Technology (QIST) could well have a vital role to play in future information and communication technologies. Quantum computing and communication techniques have the potential to transform the way we think about computing power.

Or so believes Daniele Binosi (of the Institute of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information in Innsbruck, Austria, and the European Centre for Theoretical Studies in Nuclear Physics and Related Areas in Trento, Italy) of the ERA-Pilot QIST project. “Once we can build a quantum computer, the result will be a revolution much like the initial growth in information technology. It will not be so much an evolution in processing power as a revolution. We cannot even imagine now the increase in processing power that will become available.”

A key objective for this IST-funded project is to promote QIST research in Europe by helping to structure a specialist research community, and to build improved communication channels and cooperation methods for the various groups involved. The project partners are also developing proposals for a future infrastructure that will underpin sustainable development of the progress achieved in this area.

“Scientifically,” says Binosi, “there are no obstacles to the development of quantum computing methodologies. What could slow things down is a lack of EU or regional funding. If funding is maintained at present levels we could start to lag behind the US, not to mention other countries that are coming up fast in this area, such as Australia and Japan. This is why a higher funding level for QIPC [Quantum Information Processing and Communications] in FP7, [the EU’s Seventh Framework Programme for research], is so essential to maintaining European research at the forefront in this area.”

The ‘QIPC - Strategic report on current status, visions and goals for research in Europe’ document is widely known as the ‘European QIPC roadmap’. An early challenge is, admits Binosi, that at present there is no one single technological platform upon which policy-makers can focus. The QIPC roadmap recommends that the spectrum for research funding should be kept as wide as possible in all three sub-domains: quantum communication, quantum computation and quantum information science. “It is too early to pick a winning technology now. So funding needs to support a widespread research effort – it may simply be that the killer technology has not been discovered yet!”

What other recommendations have emerged from the initial strategic report? “In the quantum computing field, we are trying to focus on technologies that are scalable,” replies Binosi. “For example nuclear magnetic resonance technology is good in principle, but not scalable. We also need to keep in mind that we should be able to miniaturise.”

Binosi points to another example in the area of quantum communications. “There is a big effort towards building a so-called quantum repeater. This is a device essential in many applications, for example, to extend the working distance of secure quantum cryptosystems. Once we succeed, we will have globally secure quantum communications, which will be unbreakable even by powerful quantum computers.”

However, one of the most important differences picked out in the European QIPC roadmap is the unique strategic approach being taken in Europe. “In comparison with other roadmaps in the area of QIPC, the characteristics of the European effort are its broader scope, beyond the focus on specific issues like security or special applications like factoring, as for example in the US roadmap,” says Binosi. “The European QIPC roadmap has a bottom-up approach, which gives us a broader perspective of research fields rather than just a focus on specific issues.”

He also points out that, “The EU and the US are aiming for slightly different research objectives in their respective QIPC roadmaps, even if both sets of objectives are extremely challenging.” Binosi notes that the EU and US roadmaps were initiated at different times and have different target dates. The US roadmap commenced in 2002, and aims to achieve its long-term goals in quantum computing by 2012, and in quantum communications / cryptography by 2014. “The EU strategic effort commenced in late 2004, and we aim to achieve our long-term goals in ten years from now.”

The first version of the strategic report produced by ERA-Pilot QIST was presented in late Summer 2005. An updated version was published as an European Commission publication in January 2006. With this initial roadmap now complete, the next steps for the project partners are to draw up a guide to national and European funding agencies, to elaborate further coordination measures and propose approaches to organisation and management.

The ERA-Pilot QIST project is scheduled for completion in 2007, when another project, QUROPE, will take over and expand activities.

Jernett Karensen | alfa
Further information:
http://istresults.cordis.lu/

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world
18.05.2017 | RMIT University

nachricht Internet of things made simple: One sensor package does work of many
11.05.2017 | Carnegie Mellon University

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

Im Focus: Hydrogen Bonds Directly Detected for the First Time

For the first time, scientists have succeeded in studying the strength of hydrogen bonds in a single molecule using an atomic force microscope. Researchers from the University of Basel’s Swiss Nanoscience Institute network have reported the results in the journal Science Advances.

Hydrogen is the most common element in the universe and is an integral part of almost all organic compounds. Molecules and sections of macromolecules are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

Media accreditation opens for historic year at European Health Forum Gastein

16.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New approach to revolutionize the production of molecular hydrogen

22.05.2017 | Materials Sciences

Scientists enlist engineered protein to battle the MERS virus

22.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Experts explain origins of topographic relief on Earth, Mars and Titan

22.05.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>