Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The web needs to get personal

07.01.2002


In the 1990s, we dubbed the Internet the `information superhighway`. So why is it still so hard to find what we are looking for online? According to Prof. Wendy Hall of the University of Southampton, it is because the web is mostly linkless. What`s more, if we want the Web to be useful in our daily lives, web links will have to become much more personal.



Prof. Hall is head of Southampton`s Intelligence, Agents, Multimedia (IAM) Research Group. She says that hand-crafted websites generally contain few links because they are too difficult to maintain. `It is hard enough to maintain the content, let alone the links.`

Web links are also notoriously frustrating. Computers let us click on objects and text, but only to follow information paths that have already been chosen. Using current systems, users are destined to remain forever lost in cyberspace, because designers cannot anticipate each of the thousands of different ways that people might want to use - and develop - the information contained within their pages.


`Say I`m looking at information about beaches and that makes me think about ice-cream,` says Hall. `I might want information about where I can get ice-cream. Someone else looking at the same information might want to know about the best surfing beaches. Someone else might associate beaches with the D-day landings and will want information about the second World War. All of these associative links can`t be predicted by the designer of a web site.`

But what if links were not pre-determined? What if information paths could be dynamically created and tailored to our interests? Hall and her colleagues have developed new systems that do just this. The key to such systems are paths called `user trails`.

`User trails are basically a record of what information the user has visited,` explains Hall. `They can be automatically created by the system as a user navigates around an information space.`

The idea is that by having collections of "pre-recorded" trails that users have found useful, automated processes can be created to help others with similar interests find information in the same context. `The matching of users, the tasks they are trying to perform and pre-recorded trails can be undertaken by automated processes such as agents,` says Hall. `These agents ask questions such as "Who else has seen this document?" and "What other documents did they read?". They work from the experience of others.`

Hall says travel guides use a similar principle in the non-digital world. `Someone has visited the city before and we use the information available in the guide to help us get to where we want to go,` she explains. `Printed travel guides aren`t so personalised but web-based ones could be.`

In the future, agents and user trails will help people learn by virtually following those with similar interests. `We won`t look for people who are going the same way as us, but our agents will,` says Hall.

Although the web is often presented as a mechanism that replaces human contact, Hall`s research suggests that the very opposite is true. Internet systems which rely on `user trails` will have human activity patterns integrated in their very core.

`At the moment we all see the same web. We actually need different webs, different sets of links, depending on what we are trying to find, what we know already and what context we are in,` says Hall.

The job for technologists, says Hall, is to put these more personal elements back into the system to reduce our dependence on pre-determined paths and links.

`One thing is certain,` says the scientist, `the Web will disappear behind the screens! And with it will go the buttons. Hypermedia is more than just point-to-point links. It is about making connections or establishing relationships. What we need to do is go "back to the future" in reducing our dependence on buttons.`

Dr Lloyd Anderson | alphagalileo

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Drones that drive
27.06.2017 | Massachusetts Institute of Technology, CSAIL

nachricht Ahead of the Curve
27.06.2017 | Institute of Science and Technology Austria

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Collapse of the European ice sheet caused chaos

27.06.2017 | Earth Sciences

NASA sees quick development of Hurricane Dora

27.06.2017 | Earth Sciences

New method to rapidly map the 'social networks' of proteins

27.06.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>