Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

'Womb' service for student midwives

20.07.2006
A pregnant robot will offer a helping hand to student midwives, as they learn to cope with the most complex of births before ever meeting a real mother.

Sheffield Hallam University has just taken ownership of a state-of-the-art mother and baby simulator to give student midwives practical experience of birthing mothers and newborns before they enter a real clinical setting.

The simulator, called Noelle, is computer programmable and can go through hundreds of different births - some short (warp speed is a full delivery in five minutes) and without complications and some longer (up to six hours) and much more complex, including breach births, caesarean sections, premature births and ventouse deliveries.

During the delivery healthcare students can monitor the heart rates of both mother and baby and can also keep a check on the baby's vital signs.

When the baby is finally born it can be programmed to have a number of complications and the students must care for both mother and baby in an appropriate manner.

Noelle is manufactured by Gaumard. Our technicians have named the full term baby Holly and the pre-term baby Ivy.

Linda Lang, Acting Deputy Dean in the Faculty of Health and Wellbeing explains, "The birthing simulator provides a realistic experience for students and allows them to experience difficult births that they may otherwise never encounter during their training.

"At Sheffield Hallam we teach in state-of-the-art realistic clinical settings so Noelle can find herself in an operating theatre having a caesarean at one moment, in a ward in the early stages of labour the next or even in a simulated home birth. This allows us the flexibility to provide our students with a much wider range of experience than they would otherwise receive, and it gives them a real edge in preparation for working in real practice settings.

"Noelle and her newborn are the latest additions to our human simulator family and mean that all of our health care students can now benefit from this new technology.

"The simulators allow us to teach in an inter-professional way so that nurses, midwives, paramedics, physiotherapists and other health care professionals can work together in a realistic environment. This mimics the way they will work when they qualify and develops their communications skills and confidence."

Lorna Branton | alfa
Further information:
http://www.shu.ac.uk

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Stable magnetic bit of three atoms
21.09.2017 | Sonderforschungsbereich 668

nachricht Drones can almost see in the dark
20.09.2017 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering

Calculating quietness

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>