Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

The World Cup straight to your pocket

08.06.2006


With the countdown well and truly under way to the biggest sporting extravaganza on the planet, a European research initiative is hoping the 2006 World Cup will kick-start its own plans to bring cross-media content closer to the consumer.



The INCCOM project is taking advantage of the huge interest in this summer’s soccer finals in Germany to introduce consumers to new ways of enjoying football using the latest mobile communication technologies.

“It’s the perfect opportunity to showcase the possibilities of cross-media contents for mass audiences,” explains Eduardo de la Fuente Gallego, Telefónica I+D representative of the INCCOM consortium. “From the customer’s perspective, we are dealing with a net improvement of the sports experience before, during and after a game – even between games. End users can be kept updated wherever they may be, on the device of their choice, with access to live coverage while on the move. There is also the possibility of delivering more personally tailored content to support individual niche needs,” he says.


Although much hype has been generated around the concept of mobile television, the market is not yet producing real multimedia programs or services and the main media channels are still characterised by companies focused on single media. ‘Cross-media’, by contrast, essentially aims to distribute the same content through different media channels. The reality is that an increasing number of wireless devices with mutually incompatible data and screen formats make it even more difficult to achieve this objective to ‘create once, publish many’.

This is where INCCOM sees a genuine opportunity to encourage all the main players to work together to accelerate the adoption of compelling platform-independent content and to create new business models to promote cross-media services. Sport, and in particular football, is seen as the ideal springboard to test the market viability of the concept.

For broadcasters and mobile operators, there are also compelling arguments in favour of collaboration to develop cross-media content specially adapted for the mobile generation.

Another plus is the possibility to produce and create content once and then publish everywhere. There are other cost savings to be made as well, points out Asko Marttila, representing Siemens Communications in the project.

“Broadcasters can save expensive production and human resources costs with this approach. For example, by using DVB-H, the specification for bringing broadcast services to battery-powered handheld receivers, lots of channels may be fed with the ‘raw camera content’ without expensive programme director involvement,” he says.

According to Marttila, the rich possibilities of this technology was demonstrated at the Athletics World Championship in Helsinki in 2005, where in addition to the standard DVB-T [terrestrial digital video broadcast]/cable television programme, seven specific DVB-H channels with separate feeds for different events – e.g. short distance races, long distance running, marathon, long jump, etc – were broadcast.

“So far it has turned out that cooperation and even discussion between, for example, the telecom operators and broadcasters, has been hard to facilitate because their expectations on cross-media and mobile TV services differ remarkably from each other. If the industries are not able to trust each other and cooperate in a cost effective way, the business won’t take off and there will be no new revenues to share,” says Hannele Antikainen, Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT.

To aid the process INCCOM has developed a methodology and toolset to analyse and forecast the likely cross-media service adoption, and to model the complex relationships between the companies participating in service creation and delivery.

“We would welcome an EU-wide approach to solve the problems relating to technical standards and regulations. Just like the introduction of the GSM standard, this would enable an EU-wide market geared towards the end users and facilitate, for instance, roaming and free transfer of devices that still work after crossing borders. This would surely also be a positive step for the media industry, broadcasters, operators and suppliers as well,” Marttila adds.

Such wider concerns, however, are for the longer term. With the World Cup about to kick off, INCCOM has more pressing matters on its mind.

“It’s going to be a very busy summer,” admits Wilfried Runde of Deutsche Welle. “We will be involved in some trials of mobile television technology during the World Cup and then we’ll be evaluating whether the World Cup was really able to boost cross-media and mobile business. After that, we have a pilot trial with a famous sports club in Europe at the end of the summer. There are also two pilot trials in Finland dealing with podcasting and mobile television, and there is an INCCOM congress scheduled for November,” he says.

Tara Morris | alfa
Further information:
http://istresults.cordis.europa.eu/index.cfm/section/news/tpl/article/BrowsingType/Features/ID/82298
http://istresults.cordis.lu/

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht NASA CubeSat to test miniaturized weather satellite technology
10.11.2017 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

nachricht New approach uses light instead of robots to assemble electronic components
08.11.2017 | The Optical Society

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

Im Focus: Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications.

Future quantum computers will be able to solve problems where conventional computers fail today. We are still far away from any large-scale implementation,...

Im Focus: Wrinkles give heat a jolt in pillared graphene

Rice University researchers test 3-D carbon nanostructures' thermal transport abilities

Pillared graphene would transfer heat better if the theoretical material had a few asymmetric junctions that caused wrinkles, according to Rice University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA detects solar flare pulses at Sun and Earth

17.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

NIST scientists discover how to switch liver cancer cell growth from 2-D to 3-D structures

17.11.2017 | Health and Medicine

The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change

17.11.2017 | Studies and Analyses

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>