Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Disability Research Leads to Chip & Pin Shoulder Surfing Fraud Breakthrough

23.05.2006


Research initially aimed at helping partially sighted customers use chip & pin keypads has led to the creation of a device which will protect all customers from "Shoulder Surfing" - A method where a "criminally motivated" bystander can casually observe consumers’ secret PIN when paying for goods or services.



Neil Radford an Enterprise Fellow at the University of Warwick has worked with colleagues in the University of Warwick’s Manufacturing Group to create a special easy to use "cradle" for chip & pin keypads, which innovatively incorporates a magnifying lens. The use of the lens (patent pending) is of significant benefit to visually impaired people, as it enlarges the pin pad display whilst also improving security. The enhanced view, to any user standing directly in front of the key pad, alone is of great benefit by reducing the degree of difficulty and the associated anxiety many face in simply reading the display - from partially sighted people through to the many people who need simply to switch to reading glasses for some tasks - whilst vendors see improved transaction times.

Importantly the device, also provides tremendous additional benefit to customers, vendors and banks in that it has been proven to be a highly effective defence against shoulder surfing, by distorting the view available from any other angle by a casual observer or even CCTV and hidden cameras, thus frustrating shoulder surfers and more sophisticated fraudsters.


Neil Radford has now established a company, Secure Access Solutions Limited, to market the "PED Cradle".

This week Boots will pilot 35 cradles in one its main city centre stores. Secure Access Solutions are also in discussions with the Royal National Institute of the Blind who are giving their expert aasessment. Additional trials will be held with RNIB in June and July. Neil Radford said:

"The PED Cradle delivers that extra layer of security and improved accessibility in one simple easy to use device. We are delighted that 3 years of careful and detailed research & product development has won support and interest from the manufacturers of Chip & Pin terminals, Retailers and Banks. Now we have this wonderful opportunity of an in store trial with Boots."

Clive Barber of Boots Operations said:

"Boots is constantly looking for ways to improve customer accessibility and safety. We believe this device could be of great benefit to our partially sighted customers, aiding their experience of shopping with chip & PIN. We also believe that the additional security provided by the unit may provide a useful benefit to all our customers."

Secure Access Solutions have identified how the same issues affect transactions at ATM Cash points and are already well advanced with a range of complementary products for ATM’s, which are scheduled for further trials later this year with a UK Bank.

Peter Dunn | alfa
Further information:
http://www.warwick.ac.uk

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Rules for superconductivity mirrored in 'excitonic insulator'
08.12.2017 | Rice University

nachricht Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go
08.12.2017 | University of California - San Diego

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

Im Focus: Virtual Reality for Bacteria

An interdisciplinary group of researchers interfaced individual bacteria with a computer to build a hybrid bio-digital circuit - Study published in Nature Communications

Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have managed to control the behavior of individual bacteria by connecting them to a...

Im Focus: A space-time sensor for light-matter interactions

Physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (run jointly by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics) have developed an attosecond electron microscope that allows them to visualize the dispersion of light in time and space, and observe the motions of electrons in atoms.

The most basic of all physical interactions in nature is that between light and matter. This interaction takes place in attosecond times (i.e. billionths of a...

Im Focus: A transistor of graphene nanoribbons

Transistors based on carbon nanostructures: what sounds like a futuristic dream could be reality in just a few years' time. An international research team working with Empa has now succeeded in producing nanotransistors from graphene ribbons that are only a few atoms wide, as reported in the current issue of the trade journal "Nature Communications."

Graphene ribbons that are only a few atoms wide, so-called graphene nanoribbons, have special electrical properties that make them promising candidates for the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

Blockchain is becoming more important in the energy market

05.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Making fuel out of thick air

08.12.2017 | Life Sciences

Rules for superconductivity mirrored in 'excitonic insulator'

08.12.2017 | Information Technology

Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go

08.12.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>