Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Beaming the internet across Europe: new project aims to connect buildings using antennae not wires

11.05.2006


Developing ways to connect homes and businesses to the internet without using wires is the aim of a new project announced today. The research at Imperial College London could help users across Europe to access the internet, by removing the need to lay out connecting phone lines or other cables between the public internet and a user’s building or network.



At present, although it is possible to make use of wireless technology within homes and office buildings, the connection from these buildings back to the public internet requires wires. External routers connect local area networks to the public internet through strings of phone lines, ’T1’ lines or optical fibres.

The new project, which sees Imperial working with academic and industrial partners across Europe, aims to use wireless links with advanced antennae instead of such wires to beam a radio signal between buildings’ local area networks and external routers. A mesh of routers beaming data between them would form a wireless network which would relay data to and from the public internet.


The use of wireless technologies has the potential to greatly increase access to the internet for users in urban areas and also in remote areas where it might be costly or physically difficult to lay out wires. It is also anticipated that a network using multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) antennae would be able to carry data at very high speeds. In comparison, present wired technologies such as ADSL and T1 lines can carry a more limited amount of data than the wireless network, and optical fibres can carry high amounts of data but are relatively expensive.

Issues that the project will be tackling include making certain that networking technologies can work efficiently with the MIMO antennae design, ensuring that the electro-magnetic waves from the antennae head in precisely the right direction and minimising any radio interference that these waves might cause.

Professor Kin Leung, project coordinator from both the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering and the Department of Computing at Imperial College, said: "The internet has become an integral part of our daily life and continues to grow. Instead of relying on the use of traditional wired lines, we need to explore alternative, efficient technologies to connect users in homes and office buildings to the internet.

"Our challenge here is to invent an integrated set of new antennae and wireless networking technologies that can work together efficiently to meet such needs. We are hoping that we could see this technology in use within the next five to ten years," he added.

The project, named MEMBRANE (Multi-Element Multihop Backhaul Reconfigurable Antenna Network), is expected to run until June 2008, by which time the project team are hopeful they will have built a prototype of the key elements of the new wireless network.

The Imperial researchers are working on the project alongside partners from Lucent Technologies, ETH Zurich, Intel, CEFRIEL, Intracom and Telefonica. The MEMBRANE project is part-funded with €2.8 million by the European Community’s 6th Framework Programme.

Laura Gallagher | alfa
Further information:
http://www.imperial.ac.uk

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Deep Learning predicts hematopoietic stem cell development
21.02.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Sensors embedded in sports equipment could provide real-time analytics to your smartphone
16.02.2017 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>