Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Retail display revolution saving supermarkets millions

22.03.2006


Paper labels in supermarkets could become a thing of the past, thanks to a revolutionary digital display system that could also give mobile phones a much longer life.

The new type of electronic display could save retailers millions by allowing product information on the supermarket shelves to be changed globally, at the touch of a button. Labour costs linked to price changes in stores could plummet and supermarkets will be doing their bit for the environment by scrapping the paper system. Shoppers will also benefit from clearer and more accurate signs on the shelves.

ZBD Displays Ltd is behind a revolutionary device being developed with help from Sheffield Hallam University scientists. The concept has attracted £1/2million funding from the Department of Trade and Industry for a joint project with Sheffield Hallam University.



The system is based on a liquid crystal cell which, once written to, needs no power source. Scientists Professor Chris Care and Dr Tim Spencer from the University’s Materials and Engineering Research Institute (MERI) are helping develop detailed computer models of liquid crystal in the display. The models will be used to improve the technology further, by lowering the voltage the system takes to operate. It paves the way for use in smart cards and mobiles, where the technology could boost a phone’s battery life by minimising the power needed to operate its display.

The concept has already been picked up by two of the UK’s top retailers. John Lewis store Peter Jones is using it in its audiovisual and TV department and Tesco has chosen its South Wigston store in Leicester to trial the labels on the delicatessen counter.

Dr Cliff Jones, Chief Technology Officer at ZBD, said: “The feedback from our customers such as Tesco and John Lewis has been very positive. The work we are doing with Professor Care’s group at MERI will help us improve device performance and extend the use of ZBD for new applications.”

Dr Tim Spencer of MERI said: “Paper labels are used by all retailers, but they’re actually an outdated, labour-intensive and inefficient way of reflecting the ever-changing product information customers need. When you consider that with this system a supermarket chain could drop the price of a tin of beans in 1,000 stores worldwide simultaneously, the benefits are immense.”

Professor Chris Care added: “But price changes are just the start. The technology has enormous potential to embed displays into a wide range of objects, for example smart cards, since a power supply is only needed when the information in the display needs to be changed.”

Kelly Hill | alfa
Further information:
http://www.shu.ac.uk/news

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Deep Learning predicts hematopoietic stem cell development
21.02.2017 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Sensors embedded in sports equipment could provide real-time analytics to your smartphone
16.02.2017 | University of Illinois College of Engineering

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>