Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Developing the case for digital legal security

25.08.2005


Bringing technology to the judiciary, European researchers are developing pilot applications that could speed up, clarify and provide secure access to legal procedures and a start-up company to promote the results.



With partners such as SAP, Thales and Unisys, the eJustice project aims to modernise the representation of legal procedures within countries, and between authorities of EU states.

Several pilot applications are being developed and evaluated.


For example, by linking biometric ID cards and workflow processing, eJustice shows how European Arrest Warrant data can be exchanged by magistrates securely over the Internet. “There are a few dozen magistrates in Europe who can issue a European Arrest Warrant,” explains project coordinator, Michel Frenkiel. “One arrest warrant is sent to another magistrate in another Member State. It is not just the encryption of the warrant which is important. It is also the fact that you know that the other party is a magistrate who is allowed to issue such a warrant.”

By designing the components of a workable data exchange system based upon the existing online system between the Tribunal de Commerce de Paris and Germany, eJustice is also contributing to the proposed European Debt Recovery Directive. Courts are increasingly handling cases where debt needs to be recovered from third parties in another EU Member State. The proposed Directive tackles this, calling for a reliable and secure IT system between relevant authorities.

Recently eJustice unveiled Lexecute, a demonstrator of the representation of the law the project partners advocate. It features a case study based on the German ‘Mahnverfahren’ (Order for Payment Procedure). The tool enables legal procedures to be presented in a user-friendly manner, via intuitive graphical icons linked to legal texts. German law experts have declared the tool “better than traditional techniques for teaching law”. In the future, secured workflow processing based on such representations will help courts better control and report on their work.

eJustice has also linked up with an existing Austrian legal initiative called eRecht. The pioneering scheme has implemented a complete electronic process for creating legislation: from initial drafts through to the final passing of laws. In July, the Austrian Chancellery (BKA) chose security technologies developed by eJustice to integrate within eRecht. “Using eJustice technology, they will replace login password based security by something which is faster, less error-prone, and based on smart ID cards,” says Frenkiel.

eJustice has led to Frenkiel filing a patent in 2004 and establishing a start-up company, MobileGov. The patent concerns a new software security solution for detecting changes to hardware in digital systems. It guarantees that a digital system, once registered, cannot be used to access sensitive data if it has been interfered with.

“[Software] security has progressed to the point where it practically cannot be fooled by amateurs,” explains Frenkiel, “But hardware security has not progressed as fast.”

“The first idea was to make sure that we could secure the chain of production of smart ID cards,” says Frenkiel. “Then we realised that there were many, many applications which could benefit from making sure that a piece of hardware has not been tampered with.”

Initially, MobileGov is targeting the secure mobile e-government equipment market such as handheld devices for police forces, customs and fire brigades. The company already has a cooperation agreement with SAP in this area. Also, opportunities exist thanks to recent EU transport regulations stipulating that all new trucks be fitted with tachometers. “MobileGov can make sure these tachometers cannot be modified by truck drivers,” says Frenkiel.

Frenkiel is not alone in believing MobileGov has a winning idea. The company recently captured the prize for best innovation at the 12th edition of Capital IT, a major French venture capital investment forum. “We are looking for one million euro in exchange for twenty per cent of the company,” says Frenkiel. The funding is required to develop a commercial product for release in one year’s time.

Tara Morris | alfa
Further information:
http://istresults.cordis.lu/

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Stable magnetic bit of three atoms
21.09.2017 | Sonderforschungsbereich 668

nachricht Drones can almost see in the dark
20.09.2017 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The pyrenoid is a carbon-fixing liquid droplet

Plants and algae use the enzyme Rubisco to fix carbon dioxide, removing it from the atmosphere and converting it into biomass. Algae have figured out a way to increase the efficiency of carbon fixation. They gather most of their Rubisco into a ball-shaped microcompartment called the pyrenoid, which they flood with a high local concentration of carbon dioxide. A team of scientists at Princeton University, the Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford University and the Max Plank Institute of Biochemistry have unravelled the mysteries of how the pyrenoid is assembled. These insights can help to engineer crops that remove more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere while producing more food.

A warming planet

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Rainbow colors reveal cell history: Uncovering β-cell heterogeneity

22.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Penn first in world to treat patient with new radiation technology

22.09.2017 | Medical Engineering

Calculating quietness

22.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>