Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

UF, nine other universities complete ultrahigh-speed data network

27.06.2005


Whether mapping genes, probing elemental particles or monitoring global warming, more and more scientists rely on massive data vaults located at universities and institutions around the world.



Now, researchers at 10 Florida universities have the infrastructure for a computer network that ensures that capability – one faster than any other education-based network in the Southeast and among the top in the nation in speed and capacity.

Two and a half years in the making, the Florida LambdaRail Network is expected to be operating among all its member universities this week. The network, which can move information at speeds of 10 gigabits per second, has space for a total of 32 10-gigabit networks, or channels. The result: The next generation Internet has 100 times more capacity than what was available to UF previously – capacity that members will be able to purchase at a fraction of its current cost.


“Everyone believes that high-speed networking and grid technology is the future of science,” said Marc Hoit, UF’s interim associate provost of information technology and one of several UF officials involved in the project. “You have to have a high-speed network, and we now have one of the best.”

FLR is part of the National Lambda Rail, an initiative to create a national high-speed information infrastructure for research universities and technology companies. Similar regional optical networks are under way in Texas, Virginia, New York and other states -- but Florida’s FLR is the only one paid for in full by its member universities, Hoit said.

All but four of Florida’s public universities are participants in the network, which also includes the Florida Institute of Technology, Nova Southeastern University and the University of Miami.

The network relies on so-called “dark fiber,” existing buried fiber optic cable that wasn’t yet “lit up,” or tapped for use. UF won the contract for network operations and design, and UF technologists have played a lead role in designing a system to exploit more than 1,540 miles of dark fiber connecting all the member universities. Strategic partners included Cisco Systems, which provided high-speed routers and other equipment, and FiberCo, a fiber holding company. FiberCo facilitated FLR’s purchase of 1540 route miles from Level3 Communications, Inc.

Dave Pokorney, UF’s director of network services and the chief technology officer of the Florida LambdaRail, said the network is the fastest among higher education networks in the Southeast and one of the fastest in the nation.

Universities paid to participate on FLR on a sliding scale based on their size and the proposed use, with UF contributing about $1 million so far, Hoit said. The annual operating cost is expected to closely track UF’s previous Internet connection cost of $500,000, but, Pokorney said, “it’s many orders of magnitude faster than the prior network and makes provisioning of new services easier and at much reduced cost.

Casual users at the universities won’t notice the difference. But the massive amount of capacity is key to researchers such as Paul Avery, a UF professor of physics.

Before the FLR, the fastest connection available to UF physicists was about one-sixteenth what it is now, Avery said. That’s not nearly enough for the vast data sets soon to be produced by such experimental facilities as the world’s highest energy particle collider, the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, he said.

Researchers will use the collider to smash protons and ions into each other at higher energies than ever achieved before. The collisions – aimed at allowing scientists to examine the structure of matter and recreate the conditions just after the "Big Bang” – will produce trillions of particles, each of which will require detailed analysis. The resulting database is so huge that only those with the fastest networks will be able to tap into and manipulate it.

“We’re talking about moving petabytes of data, where a petabyte is a million gigabytes,” Avery said. “With the old system, it would have taken us months to download data that will now require only a few days.”

Avery, who studies high-energy physics, directs two nationwide National Science Foundation-projects aimed at engineering ultrafast computer grids. Both the GriPhyN Project and the International Virtual Data Grid Laboratory are aimed at helping scientists access and crunch the numbers from the collider and other astronomy and physics experiments.

Other Florida universities are tapping the FLR network to do research the impact of hurricanes, tornadoes and thunderstorms; to enhance distance-learning capabilities and for large-scale scientific simulation.

Marc Hoit | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ufl.edu

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Supercomputing the emergence of material behavior
18.05.2018 | University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center

nachricht Keeping a Close Eye on Ice Loss
18.05.2018 | Alfred-Wegener-Institut, Helmholtz-Zentrum für Polar- und Meeresforschung

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

Im Focus: Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA

Next-generation gravitational wave detector in space will complement LIGO on Earth

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A...

Im Focus: Entangled atoms shine in unison

A team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. This fundamental demonstration could lead to the development of highly sensitive optical gradiometers for the precise measurement of the gravitational field or the earth's magnetic field.

The age of quantum technology has long been heralded. Decades of research into the quantum world have led to the development of methods that make it possible...

Im Focus: Computer-Designed Customized Regenerative Heart Valves

Cardiovascular tissue engineering aims to treat heart disease with prostheses that grow and regenerate. Now, researchers from the University of Zurich, the Technical University Eindhoven and the Charité Berlin have successfully implanted regenerative heart valves, designed with the aid of computer simulations, into sheep for the first time.

Producing living tissue or organs based on human cells is one of the main research fields in regenerative medicine. Tissue engineering, which involves growing...

Im Focus: Light-induced superconductivity under high pressure

A team of scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg investigated optically-induced superconductivity in the alkali-doped fulleride K3C60under high external pressures. This study allowed, on one hand, to uniquely assess the nature of the transient state as a superconducting phase. In addition, it unveiled the possibility to induce superconductivity in K3C60 at temperatures far above the -170 degrees Celsius hypothesized previously, and rather all the way to room temperature. The paper by Cantaluppi et al has been published in Nature Physics.

Unlike ordinary metals, superconductors have the unique capability of transporting electrical currents without any loss. Nowadays, their technological...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Supersonic waves may help electronics beat the heat

18.05.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Keeping a Close Eye on Ice Loss

18.05.2018 | Information Technology

CrowdWater: An App for Flood Research

18.05.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>