Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Europe’s first interactive system bringing GRID technology to the final user

02.05.2005


Ever since the internet was created, it has developed and advanced as new services have been introduced that have made it easier to access and send data between remote computers. Electronic mail and the easy-to-use interactive interface known as the World Wide Web are just two of the most important services that have helped to make the internet as popular as it is today. GRID technology, one of the latest systems that has been developed for linking computing resources, connects hundreds of large computers so they can share not only data itself, but also data processing capability and large storage capacity. This technology has now taken an important step forward: the hardware and tools required to make the interface interactive have become available. The UAB has participated in the project, taking charge of creating software to coordinate access between the different computers in the new system.



The most important new feature is that the system is interactive. The user works with a “virtual desktop” using commands and graphics windows that allow clear and easy access to all the resources on the GRID network, just like when someone browses through folders on a laptop computer. This system has enormous potential in many different fields.

One possible application is in those fields in which one needs to transform large quantities of information into knowledge, using simulations, analysis techniques and data mining, to make decisions. For example, a surgeon working from a remote location who needed to suggest different configurations for a bypass operation using information obtained through a scan on the patient could compare different simulations and observe in real time the blood flow in each simulation. Thanks to the new interactive system the surgeon would be able to use the simulations to make the best possible decision.


Another type of problem for which the new system could be useful would be in procedures requiring huge data processing capabilities and access to large distributed databases. This would be the case for an engineer in a thermal power station who needed to decide upon the best time to use different fuels, taking into account the way pollution would spread based on a specific weather model for the local area around the station.

Led by Miquel Ángel Senar, of the UAB’s Graduate School of Engineering (ETSE), the research team at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona has developed the software needed to coordinate and manage interactive use of the GRID network. The software allows several processors to be used simultaneously. The task of this service developed at the UAB is to carry out automatically all the steps required so that the user applications may be run in one of the GRID resources selected in a clear way by the service itself.

The system was developed as part of CrossGRID, a European project which received a five million euro investment and the support of 21 institutions from across Europe. In Spain, in addition to those from the UAB, there are also researchers from the Higher Council for Scientific Research (CSIC) and the University of Santiago de Compostela playing a vital role in the project. The team from the CSIC was responsible for the first application of the system: a neural network to search for new elementary particles in physics; the team from the University of Santiago de Compostela adapted an application for measuring air pollution as explained above in the example of the thermal power station.

Octavi López Coronado | alfa
Further information:
http://www.uab.es/uabdivulga/eng

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano
20.10.2017 | Brown University

nachricht New software speeds origami structure designs
12.10.2017 | Georgia Institute of Technology

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

20.10.2017 | Information Technology

Strange but true: Turning a material upside down can sometimes make it softer

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>