Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


GRID - The Next Big Technology After The Internet?


The Internet as we know it may soon be out of date but Europe will be playing a vital role in setting the standards for future communication, thanks to a €1.45 million project funded by the Information Society Technology (IST) Programme of the European Union’s Framework Programme.

The GRID is widely seen as a step beyond the Internet, incorporating pervasive high bandwidth, high-speed computing, intelligent sensors and large-scale databases into a seamless pool of managed and brokered resources that will be available to everyone.

With project partners in the UK, Germany, France and Poland, GRIDSTART was given the specific objective of consolidating technical advances in Europe, encouraging interaction amongst similar activities both in Europe and the rest of the world and stimulating the early take-up by industry and research of Grid-enabled applications.

“The GRID is much more than just a high-speed Internet” says Maureen Wilkinson, GRIDSTART project manager. “Major information technology vendors such as IBM, Sun and Microsoft are looking to build on high-speed networking to offer grid services - a complete new set of network services designed to take advantage of the higher bandwidths such infrastructures offer.

“Many key businesses are now moving towards ‘grid services’ and our clear goal is to develop sustainable, effective and universal solutions addressing the needs of science, industry and the public.

“The potential benefits and social impact of the GRID are so great, that it is imperative to involve industry and the service-provision community at an early stage to ensure that the European economy and society can take full advantage of this revolution. “The initiative brings together technologists, scientists and industry in a multi-disciplinary approach to developing the GRID infrastructure.

“The objective of GRIDSTART is to maximise the impact of EU-funded Grid and related activities through the clustering of the currently funded projects and thereby enhance the potential of the new Grid technologies to benefit the people of the European Union.”

This objective will primarily be achieved by consolidating technical advances across a cluster of 18 Framework funded projects in order to exploit fully the synergies between their activities. It will also drive forward GRID developments by identifying and amplifying synergies between different application areas and encourage interaction amongst similar activities within Europe and worldwide.

Peter Walters, UK National Contact Point for IST within the EU’s 6th Framework Programme, believes the grant has been wisely used, saying: “It is vital we ensure that Europe plays a full role in the setting of international standards in communications technology and, as the EU’s main vehicle for support of leading edge, internationally collaborative R&D, the Framework Programmes are ideally placed to help with funding.

The GRIDSTART project will consolidate technical developments and interaction between projects, act as a focused voice in the development of international standards and disseminate European Grid developments to a wide European audience.” “The current Framework Programme (FP6) runs until 2006 and organisations wanting free information on how to access some of the €19bn available should log on to or call central telephone support on 0870 600 6080.” Further details of the 18 projects can be found at

Dave Sanders | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality
19.10.2016 | University of Waterloo

nachricht Quantum computers: 10-fold boost in stability achieved
18.10.2016 | University of New South Wales

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

Im Focus: New Products - Highlights of COMPAMED 2016

COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

In 2016, the joint pavilion by the IVAM Microtechnology Network, the Product Market “High-tech for Medical Devices”, will be located in Hall 8a again and will...

Im Focus: Ultra-thin ferroelectric material for next-generation electronics

'Ferroelectric' materials can switch between different states of electrical polarization in response to an external electric field. This flexibility means they show promise for many applications, for example in electronic devices and computer memory. Current ferroelectric materials are highly valued for their thermal and chemical stability and rapid electro-mechanical responses, but creating a material that is scalable down to the tiny sizes needed for technologies like silicon-based semiconductors (Si-based CMOS) has proven challenging.

Now, Hiroshi Funakubo and co-workers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, in collaboration with researchers across Japan, have conducted experiments to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Novel mechanisms of action discovered for the skin cancer medication Imiquimod

21.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Second research flight into zero gravity

21.10.2016 | Life Sciences

How Does Friendly Fire Happen in the Pancreas?

21.10.2016 | Life Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>