Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Galileo moves forward

19.07.2004


The GalileoSat development and in-orbit validation phase is well under way and the European Space Agency (ESA) has just released its procurement process to Industry indicating that the first completely civil satellite navigation system is moving forward.



Galileo Implementation: a phased approach

The Galileo Programme is being implemented in three phases:
Definition phase


Development and in-orbit validation
Full Deployment and Operations
The Definition phase was completed in 2003 resulting in the basic specifications for the system.

The Development and In-Orbit Validation phase was initiated in late 2003. This phase aims to perform an in-orbit validation of the system using a reduced constellation of four satellites which is the minimum number to guarantee the provision of exact positioning and time at test locations.

Early in this phase, an experimental satellite will also be launched, to secure the Galileo frequency filings, to characterize the orbits to be used by the in-orbit validation satellites and to test some of the critical technologies, such as the atomic clocks.

The experimental satellite will be launched before the end of 2005. The in-orbit validation will take place before 2007.

The Development and In-Orbit Validation phase will be followed by the Full Deployment phase which will cover the manufacturing and launch of the remaining satellites and the completion of the ground segment. Once all satellites have been fully deployed, the operation will initiate with the complete constellation of 27 operational satellites and three in reserve, all stationed on three circular Medium Earth Orbits (MEOs) at an altitude of 23 222 km and with an inclination of 56º to the equator. To support this there will be an extensive network of ground stations, and local and regional service centres.

For its part the Galileo Joint Undertaking, created jointly by the European Commission and ESA, started the process for choosing the concessionaire, the future “Galileo Operating Company” which will take charge of the final deployment then the operations.

Galileo: a global dimension in international cooperation

In parallel to these technical steps the political aspects of this programme are evolving with the agreement dealt between the European Union and the United States. This agreement was signed in June 2004 at the EU-US summit in Dublin. This allows to truly envisage the compatibility and interoperability of Galileo and GPS for the benefit of everyone. Galileo with GPS, not forgetting the Russian system GLONASS, should become the world standard for satellite navigation. This underlines the global dimension of Galileo with agreements with other countries like China, India, Canada, Israel either signed or under discussion.

All phases of Galileo are advancing in the same direction for the implementation of a system that will revolutionize our daily lives in various sectors, offering Europeans, and indeed the world at large, an accurate and secured means of satellite positioning.

Dominique Detain | alfa
Further information:
http://www.esa.int

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht A novel hybrid UAV that may change the way people operate drones
28.03.2017 | Science China Press

nachricht Timing a space laser with a NASA-style stopwatch
28.03.2017 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A Challenging European Research Project to Develop New Tiny Microscopes

The Institute of Semiconductor Technology and the Institute of Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, both members of the Laboratory for Emerging Nanometrology (LENA), at Technische Universität Braunschweig are partners in a new European research project entitled ChipScope, which aims to develop a completely new and extremely small optical microscope capable of observing the interior of living cells in real time. A consortium of 7 partners from 5 countries will tackle this issue with very ambitious objectives during a four-year research program.

To demonstrate the usefulness of this new scientific tool, at the end of the project the developed chip-sized microscope will be used to observe in real-time...

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

'On-off switch' brings researchers a step closer to potential HIV vaccine

30.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

Penn studies find promise for innovations in liquid biopsies

30.03.2017 | Health and Medicine

An LED-based device for imaging radiation induced skin damage

30.03.2017 | Medical Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>