Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Using biometrics to securely check virtual identities

27.05.2004


By linking biometrics with cryptographic authentication, the VIPBOB IST project has developed a new and more secure method of verifying a person’s unique identification number using an old-fashioned, but proven method - the fingerprint.



Biometrics refers to the measurement of certain properties of the human body, such as the ridges on the fingertip, the structure of this iris or the pattern of speech. Many of these properties are truly random - they are different even for genetically identical twins. As a result, biometrics is the only authentication method that can verify the identity of a person.

Conventional biometrics compares a biometric trait with a stored sample, or template. VIPBOB’s ’virtual PIN’ (Personal Identification Number) maps a user’s biometric trait to a unique number, thus avoiding the need to store the template. Because the trait is never stored, it can never be attacked. In addition, because the virtual PIN is calculated using biometrics, it may be chosen freely and changed as often as desired.


Project partners worked on solving compatibility and privacy issues. An obstacle to existing biometric methods is that they are incompatible with existing infrastructure, such as Automated Teller Machines. VIPBOB’s virtual PIN is obtained by mapping a vector from a biometric trait such as a fingerprint or an iris onto a unique value using error correcting codes.

The result is an advanced fingerprint authentication technology that can be built into almost any device. This split-second identification process can be applied to mobile phones or databases and integrated into well-established authentication protocols.

Project manager Ullrich Martini, Giesecke & Devrient GmBH, Munich, explains that using VIPBOB technology, it is possible to create a biometric database that does not infringe on the privacy of the people enrolled in it: "Creating a database of biometric traits raises privacy concerns. The technology developed enters biometrically encrypted data. Instead of matching the biometric trait of a new applicant, the system decrypts the stored data."

For example, a database of visa applicants whose data is stored using biometrics could detect a person attempting to enter a country several times using a false passport or visa because the digital print is contained in an electronic chip in the document. A mobile phone application would be straightforward. There is no PIN to enter; the phone is activated by biometrics - a simple touch of the finger.

Although the two-year VIPBOB project ended February 2004, the partners are continuing their collaboration to optimise an iris biometrics application.

Contact:
Ullrich Martini
Giesecke & Devrient GmbH
Prinzregentenstrasse 159
Postfach 800729
D-81677 Munich
Germany
Tel: +49-89-41192152
Email: ullrich.martini@de.gi-de.com

Source: Based on information from VIPBOB

Tara Morris | IST Results
Further information:
http://istresults.cordis.lu/index.cfm?section=news&tpl=article&BrowsingType=Features&ID=65236

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht PhoxTroT: Optical Interconnect Technologies Revolutionized Data Centers and HPC Systems
11.12.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Zuverlässigkeit und Mikrointegration IZM

nachricht Rules for superconductivity mirrored in 'excitonic insulator'
08.12.2017 | Rice University

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

Im Focus: Virtual Reality for Bacteria

An interdisciplinary group of researchers interfaced individual bacteria with a computer to build a hybrid bio-digital circuit - Study published in Nature Communications

Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have managed to control the behavior of individual bacteria by connecting them to a...

Im Focus: A space-time sensor for light-matter interactions

Physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (run jointly by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics) have developed an attosecond electron microscope that allows them to visualize the dispersion of light in time and space, and observe the motions of electrons in atoms.

The most basic of all physical interactions in nature is that between light and matter. This interaction takes place in attosecond times (i.e. billionths of a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Midwife and signpost for photons

11.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

How do megacities impact coastal seas? Searching for evidence in Chinese marginal seas

11.12.2017 | Earth Sciences

PhoxTroT: Optical Interconnect Technologies Revolutionized Data Centers and HPC Systems

11.12.2017 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>