Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Image processing means you can see both the wood and the trees

11.11.2003


During her doctoral research in the Netherlands, Gemma Piella developed a new method for processing images. With this method more details are visible at a lower resolution than the original image: both the wood and the individual trees are distinct. Piella also combined various images of the same object to produce a detailed complete picture.



Mathematician Gemma Piella has developed a new technique for processing images. For this she used a mathematical operation that makes use of so-called wavelets. Just like a sinus, the upward and downward deviation of each of these small waves is the same. However, the wavelets only exist over a short distance and all of the peaks and troughs have different heights and widths. These characteristics ensure that a single operation can simultaneously render both large and small objects visible. This enables you to see both the entire wood and the individual trees at the same time.

A scene can only be fully understood if it can be seen at many different levels. For example, if you see a wood from a distance, your first impression is just a green surface. If you come closer by, you can see the trees. If you zoom in even further still, you can even see the leaves and the bark. Therefore, which information you extract from the picture depends upon the level at which you see it. So-called multiresolution techniques such as those used by Piella, render all details, at every level in the image visible at the same time.


The researcher modified existing wavelet techniques. Suppose that an image contains smooth areas which are separated by pieces of regularly crooked lines. Standard wavelets are good at isolating the start and end points of the crooked lines but not in recognising the trajectory of the line. Piella ensured that the wavelets made use of the geometrical information in the signal to be processed. As a result of this even the smallest details became clearly visible in images with a low resolution.

The mathematician also used her innovative technique to combine different images of the same object into a single detailed image. This is important, for example, in medicine, where imaging techniques are used to visualise different aspects of the human body. For example, combining a CT scan and an MRI scan of the brain makes both the brain tissue and the bones visible.

For further information please contact Dr Gemma Piella (Signals and Images, CWI and now working at the Telecommunications Engineering School, Polytechnical University of Catalonia, Spain), tel. +34 (0)93 4017758, e-mail: gemma.piella@cwi.nl or her assistant supervisor Dr H.J.M.A. Heijmans, tel. +31 (0)20 5924057, e-mail: Henk.Heijmans@cwi.nl. The doctoral thesis was defended on 30 October 2003 at the Universiteit van Amsterdam. Dr Piella’s supervisor was Prof. P. W. Hemker.

Lydie van der Meer | NWO
Further information:
http://www.nwo.nl

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht Efficient time synchronization of sensor networks by means of time series analysis
24.01.2017 | Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt

nachricht Ultra-precise chip-scale sensor detects unprecedentedly small changes at the nanoscale
18.01.2017 | The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Scientists spin artificial silk from whey protein

X-ray study throws light on key process for production

A Swedish-German team of researchers has cleared up a key process for the artificial production of silk. With the help of the intense X-rays from DESY's...

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Breaking the optical bandwidth record of stable pulsed lasers

24.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Choreographing the microRNA-target dance

24.01.2017 | Life Sciences

Spanish scientists create a 3-D bioprinter to print human skin

24.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>