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A wink is enough to switch off the PC

15.11.2002


It is already possible for PC users to switch off simply by winking their eyes, but it is expected this will soon be possible wirelessly! Now in its start-up phase, the Academy of Finland’s Research Programme on Proactive Information Technology or PROACT includes a project dedicated to the development of wireless technology. One of the applications is a PC interface controlled by eye movement.



All five Academy research programmes launched during 2002 will benefit from international funding. In the case of PROACT, the Academy will be working closely with the French Ministry of Research and French research teams.

The technology is already in place


Bioelectric changes in human muscles are measured for various different purposes for instance in the field of health care. Senior Assistant Veikko Surakka from the University of Tampere has the job of coordinating one of the PROACT projects that is concerned with studying and testing wireless sensor technology for the measurement and interpretation of the physiological and bioelectric changes caused by emotional reactions in humans. The main focus will be on the measurement of changes occurring in the heart, brain, muscles as well as in the electric function of the eye.

The sensor technology is already there in place. Work in the project coordinated by Veikko Surakka will be concentrated on developing prototypes of wireless sensors as well as wireless measurement technology and data transfer:

‘We will be looking to introduce the first prototype of a wireless sensor patch that is applied to the skin by around spring 2004,’ Dr Surakka says.

One of the most exciting applications for real-time recording of the electric function of the eye and muscles is in the development a PC interface that can be operated without hands.

Apart from the operation of PCs and household appliances, reliable wireless measurement systems may have useful applications in the field of health care. One of the PROACT projects will be working to develop an ordinary-looking chair that measures the cardiac function of the person sitting by means of wireless data transfer techniques. A proactive application of the electromechanical EMFi film that measures sound and movement is an intelligent underfloor safety system for homes of the frail elderly: the film can detect when the occupant has suffered a fall and needs help, and when the occupant is simply bending over to pick up something that has dropped on the floor.

One of the major current concerns in research on proactive technology is how to get different kinds of information systems to communicate with each other. Professor Juha Tuominen from the Helsinki University of Technology is coordinating a project concerned with the development of a middleware platform for the linking of mobile and fixed computer and datacommunications systems. This kind of platform will make it easier for mobile emergency units to maintain contact with headquarters. This project also involves French researchers.

Three Finnish-French projects in the programme

The PROACT programme comprises three independent projects and 11 consortia that involve at least two research teams with a joint research plan. During the three years of the programme from 2002 through to 2005, Academy funding will amount to more than EUR 5.3 million. The French Ministry of Research has earmarked EUR 2 million that will be spent on supporting three projects; one of these projects is funded from the Finnish side by the National Technology Agency Tekes.

‘Although foreign projects have not had a very prominent role in these first jointly funded Academy programmes, international funding cooperation has now got off the ground and the experiences so far have been very good. As we continue our efforts to further develop international cooperation, it is important to bear in mind that the themes for research programmes and the funding partners must be chosen with a view to the needs of cooperation,’ says Academy of Finland Director of Research Anneli Pauli.

Research results in the public domain

Right now, research in the field of proactive information technology is booming the world over. A number of projects are underway in the United States, funding is made available to this line of research through the 5th and 6th EU framework programmes, and a major new research programme has just been launched in Britain. In addition many major IT companies including Microsoft, Hewlett Packard, IBM, AT&T, Sony and Nokia all have their own proactive projects.

‘If Finland wants to keep abreast of things, this is the right time to start up a research programme in this field,’ says coordinator of the PROACT Programme Greger Lindén.

‘Several Finnish companies have gone into production with small proactive IT devices, and the National Technology Agency is funding R&D in applications. Funding from the Academy is absolutely crucial for this kind of research: none of the applications would be possible in the first place without basic research. And of course all the research results are in the public domain,’ Greger Lindén points out.

What is proactive technology?

Proactive information technology is designed to look ahead and anticipate the user’s intentions, to adapt to the situation and the individual user and to respond accordingly. A proactive system may be incorporated in a smart environment, in the auxiliary devices used by the elderly and the disabled, or it can be worn in clothes.

Marja Pemberton | alfa
Further information:
http://www.aka.fi/eng

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